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Active Directory 2008 : Publishing Active Directory Objects (part 1) - Publishing Printers

1/20/2015 3:21:36 AM
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One of the main goals of Active Directory is to make resources easy to find. Two of the most commonly used resources in a networked environment are server file shares and printers. These are so common, in fact, that most organizations have dedicated file and print servers. When it comes to managing these types of resources, Active Directory makes it easy to determine which files and printers are available to users.

With that said, take a look at how Active Directory manages to publish shared folders and printers.

1. Making Active Directory Objects Available to Users

An important aspect of managing Active Directory objects is that a systems administrator can control which objects users can see. The act of making an Active Directory object available is known as publishing. The two main publishable objects are Printer objects and Shared Folder objects.

The general process for creating server shares and shared printers has remained unchanged from previous versions of Windows: You create the various objects (a printer or a file system folder) and then enable them for sharing.

To make these resources available via Active Directory, however, there's an additional step: You must publish the resources. Once an object has been published in Active Directory, clients will be able to use it.

You can also publish Windows NT 4 resources through Active Directory by creating Active Directory objects . When you publish objects in Active Directory, you should know the server name and share name of the resource. When system administrators use Active Directory objects, they can change the resource to which the object points without having to reconfigure or even notify clients. For example, if you move a share from one server to another, all you need to do is update the Shared Folder object's properties to point to the new location. Active Directory clients still refer to the resource with the same path and name as they used before.

Without Active Directory, Windows NT 4 shares and printers are accessible only by using NetBIOS-based shares. If you're planning to disable the NetBIOS protocol in your environment, you must be sure that these resources have been published or they will not be accessible.

2. Publishing Printers

Printers can be published easily within Active Directory. This makes them available to users in your domain.

Exercise 1 walks you through the steps you need to take to share and publish a Printer object by having you create and share a printer. In order to complete the printer installation, you need access to the Windows Server 2008 installation media (via the hard disk, a network share, or the CD-ROM drive).

Exercise 1: Creating and Publishing a Printer

  1. Click Start => Control Panel => Printers => Add Printer. This starts the Add Printer Wizard.

  2. In the Choose A Local Or Network Printer page, select Add A Local Printer. This should automatically take you to the next page. If it does not, Click Next.



  3. In the Choose A Printer Port page, select Use An Existing Port. From the drop-down list beside that option, make sure LPT1: (Printer Port) is selected. Click Next.



  4. On the Install The Printer Driver page, select Generic for the manufacturer, and for the printer, highlight Generic / Text Only. Click Next.



  5. On the Type A Printer Name page, type Text Printer. Uncheck the Set As The Default Printer box and then click Next.



  6. The Installing Printer screen appears. After the system is finished, the Printer Sharing page appears. Make sure the box labeled "Share this printer so that others on your network can find and use it" is selected and accept the default share name of Text Printer.

  7. In the Location section, type Building 203, and in the Comment section, add the following comment: This is a text-only Printer. Click Next.



  8. On the You've Successfully Added Text Printer page, click Finish.



  9. Next, you need to verify that the printer will be listed in Active Directory. Click Start => Control Panel => Printers, then right-click the Text Printer icon and select Properties.

  10. Next, select the Sharing tab, and ensure that the List In The Directory box is checked. Note that you can also add additional printer drivers for other operating systems using this tab. Click OK to accept the settings.




Note that when you create and share a printer this way, an Active Directory Printer object is not displayed within the Active Directory Users And Computers tool. The printer is actually associated with the Computer object to which it is connected. Printer objects in Active Directory are manually created for sharing printers from Windows NT 4 and earlier shared printer resources.

 
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