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Sharepoint 2013 : Building an Application with Access Services (part 6) - Adding a Macro, Reporting and External Data

11/29/2013 2:22:15 AM
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2.5 Creating a New View

Now that you can identify which locations an employee has visited, it is time to expose that information to end users. Follow these steps to create an Employees by Location view on the Locations tab in the Tile Pane:

1. Click Locations in the Tile Pane.

2. Click the Add New View button. Set the View Name to Employees by Location, the View Type to Summary, and the Record Source to Employee Locations. Click the Add New View button.

3. Edit the Employees by Location view, and ensure that the left column displays the list of neighborhoods and the right column displays the Employee’s Display Name. This should happen by default.

4. Launch the application and view the results in the browser. Now end users can track projects, assign employees to those projects, and track employees by location.

2.6 Adding a Macro

Recall from the previous macros discussion that there are two distinct types of macros that can be added to an Access web application: Data macros, which impact the data in an app as an automatic reaction to data changes, and UI macros, which add user experience options as a result of user behavior in the application. For example, you could use a Data macro to automatically copy contact details from the Consultant record to the Project table after a Consultant has been assigned to the Project. User Interface macros add interactivity elements to the application. Follow these steps to add a pop-up to the app that enables an end user to see the employee details of an employee assigned to a Project in the Datasheet view.

1. In Access, click the Projects tile in the Tile Pane, and select the Datasheet View for editing.

2. Click the Consultant field; then select the Actions pop-up menu by clicking the lightning bolt button.

3. Click the On Click action button, and select OpenPopup from the list of available actions.

4. In the View field, select Employees List, and click OK.

5. Save changes to send the updates to the server; then launch the app to see the UI macro in action.

2.7 Coding for Access Web Applications

Unfortunately, there is simply no way to write code to extend or change an Access web app. There are no APIs published by Microsoft for Access Services or the ADS, and Microsoft strongly recommends against attempting to modify the HTML, CSS, or JavaScript emitted on the page of an Access web app.

2.8 Reporting and External Data

Data managed via an Access web app is actually stored in a dedicated SQL Server database. The connection details for the Access database are available in Backstage. In addition to identifying the database’s connection path, the Access Backstage view enables the creation of read-only and read/write user accounts. In addition, the Info tab of the Backstage view allows for the creation of client-side reporting databases. The Access reporting database cannot currently exist as a cloud-based web application, so Access will automatically create the required connections for reporting, as seen in Figure 7.

FIGURE 7

image

In addition to Access web apps allowing for external applications to access data, Access can leverage the data in other data stores such as SharePoint and SQL Server to create linked tables. In this manner, Access web apps can be leveraged to provide complex business logic, whereas SharePoint offers easy data access and management. When a SharePoint list is connected inside of Access apps as linked tables, the connection is a read-only connection. Data changes to the source list must be done inside of SharePoint.

3. Deploying Access Applications

Access 2013 has no deployment story because an Access web app is online from the moment the application designer supplies a location during the creation of the app. When the app has been created and uploaded to the site, it becomes available for other appropriately permitted users. Access apps can also be deployed to the private corporate store and the Microsoft online Office.com public store. Deploying an Access application online requires a code submission to Microsoft Online where the code is packaged, reviewed, and accepted to or rejected from the Office Store.

 
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- Sharepoint 2013 : Building an Application with Access Services (part 5) - Modifying Application Views, Creating a Query
- Sharepoint 2013 : Building an Application with Access Services (part 4) - Adding, Removing, and Editing Tables
- Sharepoint 2013 : Building an Application with Access Services (part 3) - Creating the Basic Application
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