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VMware View 5 : Establishing a Performance Baseline (part 8)

3/30/2015 12:42:12 AM
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Now that you have a general idea of the value vCenter Operations Manager can provide, let’s look at the customizations that are available in the adapter for VMware View. To install the adapter for View, you need to complete several steps. The first one is to install the adapter on a server. The vCenter Operations View Adapter supports Windows 2003 or 2008 R2 server.

The vCenter Operations View Adapter requires a PowerShell script to be run on the View Connection Server and .NET framework 3.5 to be installed on the Adapter Server. To install PowerShell on Windows 2008 R2, you simply add it from the feature’s options using the following steps:

1. Run Server Manager from a Windows 2008 R2 Server.

2. Right-click the Features module and select Add Feature (or run Add Feature from the Action Panel).

3. Select Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment and click Next.

If this is the Adapter Server, install the .NET Framework using the Add Feature module but select .NET Framework Features 3.5.1 instead of the Windows PowerShell Integrated Scripting Environment. When the necessary requirements are installed, you can install the View Adapter on the Adapter Server using these steps:

1. Launch the vCenter Operations Manager for View installation.

2. Click Next on the welcome screen.

3. Click Next on the End User Patent Agreement screen.

4. Accept the license terms and click Next.

5. You can change the default installation path; otherwise, accept the defaults and click Next.

6. Select the box to automatically start the VMware vCenter Operations Manager for View Configuration tool and click Install.

After you have installed the software, you need to set up the connections, but you need to run the PowerShell script on the View Connection Server to enable vCenter Operations Manager for View. The PowerShell script is called EnableViewPS and is provided as part of the installation; you can find it in c:\program files\VMware\vCenter Operations\View Adapter. On your View Connection Server, open a PowerShell window, change to the location, and run EnableViewPS.cmd (see Figure 25). The script sets up a Windows Remote Management (WinRM) listener to allow the adapter to connect to the server. You run the command and type y to tell the script to make the necessary changes. (Note: You may have to run the Set-ExecutionPolicy unrestricted command first if the script generates an error.)

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Figure 25. Run EnableViewPS.cmd.

After you have enabled the Windows Remote Management Listener, you can configure the adapter. On the first tab of the adapter configuration, set up the connection to the View Connection Server. You need to specify the server name and account that has access. You can test the connection by clicking Test. You can also monitor change events and provisioning errors by configuring a connection to the View Event database. Configure the connection and click Test. Configure the settings and click Apply (see Figure 26).

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Figure 26. Configure connectivity.

On the next tab, you configure connectivity to your vCenter Operations Server, which is actually the UI virtual appliance. This step is very confusing because the username in this section is the vCOPs admin user even though it requests a user with administrative access. It does not work with any other account but the admin user. Configure the settings and click Apply (see Figure 27).

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Figure 27. Specify vCOPs user.

To view the logs on the virtual desktops, you need to provide a domain account and administrator credentials to the desktop. This way, the adapter can collect performance metrics for PCoIP and disk, memory network, and CPU information. Configure the account and click Apply (see Figure 28).

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Figure 28. User with administrator access to desktops.

On the Advanced tab, you can set the level of logging, the frequency of collection based on the size of the environment, and the number of CPU threads used for collection. In addition, you can start the service. Start the service and click Apply (see Figure 29).

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Figure 29. Set the logging level.

 
Others
 
- VMware View 5 : Establishing a Performance Baseline (part 7)
- VMware View 5 : Establishing a Performance Baseline (part 6)
- VMware View 5 : Establishing a Performance Baseline (part 5)
- VMware View 5 : Establishing a Performance Baseline (part 4) - Configure vCenter Operations
- VMware View 5 : Establishing a Performance Baseline (part 3) - Deploy vCenter Operations
- VMware View 5 : Establishing a Performance Baseline (part 2) - Create an IP Pool
- VMware View 5 : Establishing a Performance Baseline (part 1) - Installing vCenter Operations
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