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SQL Server 2012 : Configuration Options (part 1) - Displaying the Advanced Options
If you don't run RECONFIGURE, then the config_value field still shows the change, but the change won't appear in the run_value field, even if you restart the service. Some configuration changes take effect only after SQL Server is restarted.
Configuring SQL Server 2012 : Setting the Options (part 3) - Configuring the Connection, Surface Area Configuration Facets
Connection-level options are limited in scope. If the option is set within an interactive session, then the setting is in force until it's changed or the session ends. If the option is set within a stored procedure, then the setting persists only for the life of that stored procedure.
Configuring SQL Server 2012 : Setting the Options (part 2) - Configuring the Database
Most database options can be set in Management Studio within the Database Properties page, which you can find by right-clicking a database in the console tree and choosing Properties from the context menu. Figure 2 shows the Options tab.
Configuring SQL Server 2012 : Setting the Options (part 1) - Configuring the Server
The server-level configuration options control server-wide settings, such as how SQL Server interacts with hardware, how it multithreads within Windows, and whether triggers are permitted to fire other triggers. When configuring the server, keep in mind the goals of configuration: consistency and performance.
SQL Server 2012 : Enhancing Your Troubleshooting Toolset with Powershell (part 7) - Extracting DDL Using SMO
A misplaced index or a poorly defined table definition are two examples of how changing the DDL of a database can have heavy performance implications.
SQL Server 2012 : Enhancing Your Troubleshooting Toolset with Powershell (part 6) - Index Maintenance, Managing Disk Space Utilization of Backups
To ensure maximum performance is obtained, index maintenance is an important job when managing a SQL Server. Traditionally, a DBA may have written some T-SQL to perform index maintenance, but this is not a simple task and one probably not best suited to T-SQL because of the procedural nature of the task.
SQL Server 2012 : Enhancing Your Troubleshooting Toolset with Powershell (part 5) - Interrogating Current Server Activity
When checking whether a remote computer is responsive, a good first place to investigate is the ping response. Using the win32_pingstatus WMI class, this is relatively straightforward.
SQL Server 2012 : Enhancing Your Troubleshooting Toolset with Powershell (part 4) - Interrogating Disk Space Utilization
In this example, you are going to see how to make use of one of the WMI win32-logicaldisk classes to retrieve information about disk space utilization on the server.
SQL Server 2012 : Enhancing Your Troubleshooting Toolset with Powershell (part 3) - Working Remotely
In the first version of PowerShell users were constrained to working on a local computer. This was OK if you had a single computer to manage, but many administrators work with multiple servers in complex computing environments, and it is a major limitation to remote onto each computer in order to use PowerShell.
SQL Server 2012 : Enhancing Your Troubleshooting Toolset with Powershell (part 2) - Cmdlets, Variables, Advanced Functions, and Modules
PowerShell is created upon a few core building blocks. A thorough understanding of these constituent parts will make understanding the environment a lot easier, so the following sections describe these core components.
SQL Server 2012 : Enhancing Your Troubleshooting Toolset with Powershell (part 1) - The PowerShell Environment
PowerShell 2 is pre-installed on Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 operating systems. Although PowerShell can be installed onto earlier versions of Windows, it is not immediately obvious from where you can obtain the download.
SQL Server 2012 : Authorizing Securables - A Sample Security Model
The simplest way to assign permissions when more granularity is needed is to create user-defined roles and select effective permissions. Tables 1 and 2 list sample user-defined roles and user permission settings of the user-defined database roles. Table 2 lists a few of the users and their roles.
SQL Server 2012 : Authorizing Securables - Object Security (part 2) - Managing Roles with Code, Object Security and Management Studio
Creating user-defined roles with code involves using the sp_addrole system stored procedure. The name can be up to 128 characters and cannot include a backslash, be Null, or be an empty string.
SQL Server 2012 : Authorizing Securables - Object Security (part 1) - Object Permissions , Granting Object Permissions with Code
Object permissions are assigned with the SQL DCL commands GRANT, REVOKE, and DENY. The permissions in SQL Server work like they do in the operating system. SQL Server aggregates all the permissions a given user might have whether directly assigned against the user or through the roles.
SQL Server 2012 : Authorizing Securables - Permission Chains, Object Ownership, Securables Permissions
An important aspect of SQL Server's security model involves object ownership. Every object is contained by a schema. The default schema is dbo — not to be confused with the dbo role.
Authentication Types in SQL Server 2012 : Windows Authentication, SQL Authentication
You can use Windows authentication only where Windows Active Directory is used for network and user authentication. SQL Server permits or denies access to a user after its network logon credentials have been validated by a Windows Domain Controller, without requiring a separate login name and password.
Diagnosing SQL Server 2012 Using Extended Events : Viewing Data Captured by Extended Events (part 3) - Querying a Ring Buffer Using T-SQL
Ring buffers are stored in a DMV called sys.dm_xe_session_targets, and it’s from here you query their content. This final example has created a session called Logins_rb to write its data to a ring buffer target.
Diagnosing SQL Server 2012 Using Extended Events : Viewing Data Captured by Extended Events (part 2) - Viewing Saved Data, Viewing In-Memory Targets
Some of the targets are the result of calculations being performed on captured data, rather than a dump of the raw data itself — for example, the event counter.
Diagnosing SQL Server 2012 Using Extended Events : Viewing Data Captured by Extended Events (part 1) - Viewing Live Data
This example uses the session created earlier, which captures login events after ensuring it’s started. After right-clicking on the session in SQL Server Management Studio, click the Watch Live Data option, as shown in Figure 1.
Creating Extended Events Sessions in SQL Server 2012 (part 4) - Counting the Number of Locks Acquired per Object , Creating Sessions Using T-SQL
The lock_acquired event provides all the information needed for this example, so you don’t need to use any global actions or additional event fields. Instead, because SQL Server itself has a lot of background locking activity from system processes occurring, you’ll use a filter to exclude the locking activity you’re not interested in.
Creating Extended Events Sessions in SQL Server 2012 (part 3) - Monitoring for Page Splits with Extended Events
After seeing the login example in action you may be thinking that you have yet to see Extended Events do anything you couldn’t do just as easily with a tool like Profiler. As you’ll see in the next example, it’s just as easy to capture information that has not been so easy to access previously.
Creating Extended Events Sessions in SQL Server 2012 (part 2) - Monitoring Server Logins
Having looked at the session configuration interface, now you’ll use it to deploy a session to capture perhaps the simplest event data SQL Server can generate, login information.
Creating Extended Events Sessions in SQL Server 2012 (part 1) - Introduction to the New Session Form
While the wizard option may appeal to newcomers as an easy way to get started, it’s a little too lightweight in terms of functionality to be of great use, and using the more thorough New Session creation form, shown in Figure 2, isn’t much more complicated. We recommend ignoring the wizard when you begin creating your own sessions.
Diagnosing SQL Server 2012 Using Extended Events (part 5) - Extended Events Terminology - Histogram
The histogram could well be the most useful target in your early, and perhaps later, stages of troubleshooting — if only to begin identifying trends in your data that enable you to focus on a particular type of event’s details.
Diagnosing SQL Server 2012 Using Extended Events (part 4) - Extended Events Terminology - Filters, Targets
A target is the destination for all the information you can capture with Extended Events. However, whereas the terminology used so far has been fairly straightforward, now you start to see some terms that are less self-explanatory.
Diagnosing SQL Server 2012 Using Extended Events (part 3) - Extended Events Terminology - Events, Event Fields , Actions
Once you understand what an event is, the concept of an event field is easily understood. Whereas an event is something that occurs, an event field is a piece of data about that event.
Diagnosing SQL Server 2012 Using Extended Events (part 2) - Extended Events Terminology - Sessions
An Extended Events session is a user-defined combination of events, actions, filters, and targets, which is stored within the SQL Server instance, although SQL Server also ships with some of its own system sessions as well.
Diagnosing SQL Server 2012 Using Extended Events (part 1)
While Extended Events have been around since the release of SQL Server 2008, they have not been as popular as one might expect for such a powerful troubleshooting feature.
Sharepoint 2013 : Customizing a SharePoint Site - Modify a Content Type
To modify an existing content type, open the Site Settings page, as explained at the beginning of this chapter, and click Content Types in the Galleries section of the page. This selection opens a page where you can modify content types .
Sharepoint 2013 : Customizing a SharePoint Site - Create a Content Type
A content type is a collection of site columns and additional settings that can be created for a site. To create a new content type in a site, open the Site Settings page, as explained at the beginning of this chapter, and click
 
 
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