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Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 : Email address policies (part 3) - Focusing on certain recipients by using filters

4/20/2014 9:16:45 PM
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Focusing on certain recipients by using filters

The most basic form of a recipient filter used with email address policies is that used for the default policy, which sets a scope that tells Exchange to apply the policy to every mail-enabled object in the organization. However, like dynamic distribution groups, you can create sophisticated recipient filters to focus the scope of an email address policy as tightly as you would like.

If you use the Get-EmailAddressPolicy cmdlet to examine the recipient filter for the default policy, you see that it contains this filter:

Alias -ne $null

However, the recipient filter for the email address policy for the members of the IT department is:

((Department -eq 'IT') -and (RecipientType -eq 'UserMailbox'))

In other words, “Select any recipient that is a user mailbox and has IT as its department.”

EAC offers a little less flexibility in terms of creating recipient filters for email address policies than did EMC. The benefit here is that EAC focuses on the common criteria used for recipient filters and excludes some of the more complicated and less used criteria that EMC allowed administrators to manipulate (and possibly get wrong). As always, if you need to create a more complex recipient filter, you can do so through EMS.

For now, concentrate on using EAC to create a recipient filter. This approach is similar to creating a recipient filter for a dynamic group and offers the same selection of preformatted properties from which to choose. You can:

  • Specify the kind of mail-enabled objects to which Exchange should apply the policy. Every mail-enabled object needs an email address, which is why the default email address policy applies to all kinds of mail-enabled objects. However, you might decide that rooms and resource mailboxes should have different forms of email addresses than user mailboxes. EAC enables you to select the different types of mailboxes to which a policy can apply.

  • Specify a particular Active Directory container to locate the objects for the policy to process. Each email address policy has a RecipientContainer property that tells Exchange which objects to process. By default, the property is left blank, so Exchange should process every object in the organization that matches the recipient filter. In Figure 4, a particular OU in Active Directory has been selected as a rule for the recipient container to instruct Exchange that this policy only applies to objects in that part of Active Directory.

    This screen shot shows how rules or conditions can be associated with an email address policy so that it applies to specific objects only. In this example, the policy applies to mailboxes belonging to the Sales or Marketing departments only if Account Executive is present in custom attribute 2 and France or Ireland is in the StateOrProvince attribute.

    Figure 4. Adding rules to an email address policy

  • Specify other rules to focus the policy even more tightly. These rules are those available for dynamic distribution groups and include the 15 custom attributes.

If you view the recipient policy in the email address policy created in Figure 4 by using the Get-EmailAddressPolicy cmdlet, you see:

RecipientFilter : ((((Department -eq 'Sales') -or (Department -eq 'Marketing'))) -and (((StateOrProvince -eq 'France') -or (StateOrProvince -eq 'Ireland'))) -and (CustomAttribute2 -eq 'Account Executive') -and (RecipientType -eq 'UserMailbox'))

As stated before, it’s best to restrict the number of email address policies that are used across the organization to avoid confusion and the proliferation of multiple email addresses for objects. However, if you need to create a focused email address policy, it’s probable that you can do this with EAC, and if the recipient filters generated by EAC are insufficient, you can then explore custom filters for email address policies.

 
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