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Windows 8 : Networking with Other Operating Systems - Internetworking with Windows 7, Vista, and XP (part 1) - Setting TCP/IP as the Default Network Protocol

11/27/2014 8:23:30 PM
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Windows 8’s file and printer sharing services work quite well with Windows 7, Vista, XP, and the various Windows Server versions. All of these OSs were intended from the start to work well with the TCP/IP network protocol favored by Windows 8.

For all practical purposes, Windows 8 and Windows 7 networking are virtually identical. There are no compatibility issues to worry about, other than the Network Location issue .

If your network has computers running older versions of Windows, the differences in OSs may show up in these areas:

Default networking protocols—You might have configured older computers to use the NetBIOS or SPX/IPX protocol as the primary networking protocol. Windows 8 requires that you use TCP/IP. And, it’s best if you use only TCP/IP.

LLDP mapping—By default, Windows XP computers did not come with support for LLDP, and without it, these computers will appear as “orphans” on the network map display. You can download and install an LLDP add-on for XP if you wish.

Password Protected Sharing (Simple File Sharing)—Windows can provide username/password security for shared files and folders. Windows 8, 7, Vista, and XP also have a “passwordless” option.

HomeGroup networking—Windows 8 and 7 let you join your computers into a homegroup, which simplifies file sharing security. A homegroup member can still share files and printers with older versions of Windows.

We cover these topics in the next four sections.

1. Setting TCP/IP as the Default Network Protocol

When freshly installed, Windows XP was set up to use the TCP/IP network protocol for file and printer sharing by default. If your network previously included Windows 95, 98, Me, 2000, or NT computers, you might have changed the network protocols to simplify internetworking with the older operating systems.

Because newer versions of Windows support only TCP/IP, you need to make sure that TCP/IP is enabled on your Windows XP computers. Also, Windows networking works much more reliably when every computer on the network has the exact same set of protocols installed. You should ensure that TCP/IP is the only installed network protocol.


Note

If your computer is connected to a corporate network, your network administrator will make all necessary changes for you.


Follow these steps on all your computers that run Windows XP Home Edition or XP Professional:

1. Log on using a Computer Administrator account.

2. Click Start, Control Panel, Network and Internet Connections; then click the Network Connections icon.

3. Right-click the Local Area Connection icon and select Properties.

4. Look in the list of installed components and make sure that Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is listed. If not, click Install, select Protocols, click Add, and select Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). If your network uses manually assigned (static) IP addresses, configure the Internet Protocol entry just as you configured your Windows 7 computers.

5. Look in the list of installed components for the NWLink IPX/SPX or NetBEUI protocols. Select these entries and click Uninstall.

6. Click OK to close the Local Area Connection Properties dialog box.

7. From the menu in the Network Connections window, select Advanced, Advanced Settings. Select the Adapters and Bindings tab.

8. In the top list, select Local Area Connection. In the lower list, make sure that Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) is checked under both File and Printer Sharing for Microsoft Networks and Client for Microsoft Networks.

9. Click OK to close the dialog box.

After checking all your computers, restart all your computers if you had to make changes on any of them.

 
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