IT tutorials
 
Windows
 

Windows 8 : Getting Around the Windows Desktop - Closing a Program

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019
- How to active Windows 8 without product key
- Malwarebytes Premium 3.7.1 Serial Keys (LifeTime) 2019
12/14/2014 7:52:37 PM

When you’re finished using a program, you should close it. Every open program and document consumes some resources, mostly in the form of using memory (RAM). When RAM is full, the computer has to start using virtual memory more often, which is basically space on the hard disk configured to look like RAM to the computer.

RAM has no moving parts and, thus, can feed stuff to the processor (where all the work takes place) at amazing speeds. A standard hard disk has moving parts and is much, much slower. Newer solid state drives do not rely on moving parts, but you still have speed differences between RAM and solid state drives. As soon as Windows has to start using virtual memory, everything slows down. So, you really don’t want to have a bunch of stuff you’re not using any more open and consuming resources.

There are many ways to close a program. Use whichever of the following techniques is most convenient for you, because they all produce the same result—the program is removed from memory, and both its program window and taskbar button are removed from the screen:

  • Click the Close (X) button in the program window’s upper-right corner.
  • Right-click the title bar across the top of the program window and choose Close.
  • Choose File image Exit from the program’s menu bar, if the program provides a File menu.
  • Right-click the program’s taskbar button and choose Close Window.
  • If the program is in the active window, press Alt+F4.

Tip
You can close a Windows 8 app by grabbing the top of the app window until the mouse pointer changes to a double-sided hand. Then drag the window down to the bottom of the screen.

If you were working on a document in the program and have made changes to that document since you last saved it, the program will (one hopes) ask in a message box like the example in Figure 1 whether you want to save those changes.

FIGURE 1 Last chance to save a document

image

Never take that dialog box lightly because whichever option you choose is final, and there’s no going back and changing your mind. Your options are as follows:

  • Save/Yes: The document is saved in its current state; both the document and the program close.
  • Don’t Save/No: Any and all changes you made to the document since you last saved it will be lost forever. Both the document and the program close.
  • Cancel: The program and document both remain open and on the screen. You can then continue work on the document and save it from the program’s menu bar (choose File image Save).
 
Others
 
- Windows 8 : Running Programs and Apps (part 4) - Moving and sizing from the keyboard
- Windows 8 : Running Programs and Apps (part 3) - Sizing program windows
- Windows 8 : Running Programs and Apps (part 2) - Arranging program windows
- Windows 8 : Running Programs and Apps (part 1) - Switching among open programs
- Windows 8 : Getting Around the Windows Desktop - Using Jump Lists
- Windows 8 : Getting Around the Windows Desktop - Windows Start Screen, Using the Windows Desktop
- Windows 8 : Getting Around the Windows Desktop - Logging In
- Windows 8 : Getting Around the Windows Desktop - Terminology for Things You Do
- The Windows 8 Apps (part 3) - Mail, Maps
- The Windows 8 Apps (part 2) - Finance, Internet Explorer
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS