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Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 6) - Navigating through user account pages

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2/26/2014 2:01:22 AM

Enabling or disabling the guest account

The Guest account is for anybody who might need to use your computer on a temporary basis. For example, with a home computer, you might set up a Guest account for houseguests so that they can check their e-mail, browse the web, and such. The Guest account has very limited privileges, so you don’t have to worry about guests messing things up while using your computer.

The Guest account is turned off by default. You can keep it that way until you actually need it. To activate the Guest account, go to the Manage Accounts Control Panel page and click the Guest account icon. Then choose Turn On. Likewise, should you ever need to disable the Guest account, click its icon on the Manage Accounts page and then click Turn Off the Guest account.

Navigating through user account pages

In Windows 8, user account management involves using two environments, including the Control Panel and PC Settings page. You can use the Control Panel to complete almost all user account tasks, even those that use the new PC Settings page. When you get to a task, it’s largely just a matter of choosing options and reading text that’s right on the screen. Windows provides links to advance to configuration screens. Some links are blue text (standard web hypertext color), while others use new Windows 8 buttons to display new settings or options for a task (as in Figure 12). You can use Back and Forward buttons to get around from page to page. You can click the Manage Another Account link on the User Accounts page.

FIGURE 12 The Add A User option is highlighted using the Windows 8 interface.

image

Cracking into standard user accounts

If a local standard user forgets his or her password, you can use an account that has administrative privileges to reset the standard user’s password. If you’re an administrator and just want to see what a standard user is up to, you can use this same technique to change the password and get full access to its folders.


Caution
This approach will cause the standard user to lose access to encrypted files and e-mail messages created in an e-mail program such as Windows Live Mail.

To change the password for a local standard user account:

1. Log in to a user account that has administrative privileges.
2. Go to the Manage Accounts page (press Windows Key+X and choose Control Panel, click User Accounts, and click Manage Another Account).
3. Click the password-protected account for which the user has forgotten the password.
4. Click the Change The Password link.
5. Enter a new password and then enter it again to confirm it.
6. Type a password hint.
7. Click Change Password to save the new password.

The local standard user account will now have a new password. Be sure to share this password with the user so he or she can sign into Windows.

 
Others
 
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 5) - Changing the account picture
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 4) - Changing a user account type , Password-protecting an account
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 3) - Creating a new e-mail address for a new user account
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 2) - Creating a Microsoft user account
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 1)
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Types of User Accounts
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Picture Passwords
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating Strong Passwords
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Logging In and Out of User Accounts
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