IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Prioritizing and Categorizing Notes with Tags (part 1) - Applying a Tag to a Note

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
1/30/2015 8:35:02 PM

You might have seen tags on websites before, where they are often used on blogs and news sites to group similarly themed content into categories. By clicking the category tag, you can quickly see a list of content that’s available in that category. Tags have many other, similar uses. For example, when you import photos from your digital camera into an image-editing program, it may let you apply tags to your photos to describe what appears in them (the tags would consist of keywords like landscapes, pets, children, and so on) before the pictures are added to your collection. As your photo album grows to hundreds or perhaps thousands of pictures down the road, it would become increasingly harder to find, say, all of your pictures of your dog. By using tags to categorize and search for files, you can quickly locate and display all of the items that are associated with a particular tag.

Tags can also be used to indicate the priority of an item. In Microsoft Outlook, for example, using the Important or Low Priority markers for the e-mail messages that you send is a useful way of tagging the priority of the content in such messages, thus making it easier for the recipient to decide which items require immediate attention and which ones can wait.

In OneNote, tags are an optional way for you to categorize and prioritize selected notes, and you can also use note tags to aid in quickly locating and displaying specific, important information again whenever you need it. Before you get to OneNote’s powerful search features, however, take a closer look at using tags.

In OneNote, a tag consists of an icon that will appear next to your notes text to mark the note (see Figure 1). Each tag also has a description that indicates its category or purpose (for example, Important, Idea, Client Request, and so on).
Figure 1. Note tags are small icons that you can apply to the left of selected text paragraphs or to other objects on a page, such as a picture, to indicate the tagged item’s priority, classification, or follow-up status. OneNote can search your notes for tags to help you find high-priority follow-up items instantly.


For example, if you tag all of the distinct ideas that come up during a brainstorming session with your team, it’s much easier to scan your notes and look for the lightbulb icon that represents the Idea tag. To see the descriptive name of a tag, move the mouse pointer over the tag’s icon once it has been applied to a part of your notes.

Applying a Tag to a Note

To apply a tag to a note, follow these steps:

1.
Open or create a page with a couple of paragraphs of notes.

2.
Click the first line of any paragraph of text on the page. This lets OneNote know which paragraph you want to tag with an icon.

3.
On the Home tab, in the Tags group, click the yellow star icon that is labeled “Important.” OneNote places the yellow star icon in the left margin of the current paragraph. If you move the mouse over the star icon, a ToolTip appears to let you know that this is the note tag for indicating important notes.

To see all available tags in OneNote, click the Home tab and then, in the Tags group, click the small downward-facing arrow at the bottom of the tags list box. A ToolTip will say “More” if you hover over this arrow (see Figure 2). When you click this button, OneNote displays the full collection of available note tags and reveals the command for customizing your own tags.

Figure 2. To access the full list of available note tags and to gain access to additional tag commands, click the More button in the lower-right corner of the Tags list.


Tagging isn’t just reserved for typed text. You can tag handwritten notes, inserted files and printouts, pictures, screen clippings, scanned images, and any other objects that you’ve placed on your notes page.

Though tagging your notes is entirely optional, it’s quite useful in a variety of situations, depending on how you collect and then want to use the information in your notebooks. You can use tags to flag important notes for follow-up (for example, the action items assigned to you in a meeting). You can also use tags to categorize information in your notes (for example, to identify all of the ideas during brainstorming and all the questions that have been asked about them). Finally, you can also use tags to identify multiple projects that are associated with specific follow-up items or reminders and list these in separate or combined to-do lists. OneNote does all the work, leaving you to spend your time focusing on your notes and information, your thoughts and ideas, instead of flipping through all of your pages, trying to find specific information in your notebook. Applying tags and the ability to fully customize these tags is yet another way in which OneNote beats paper notebooks every time.


Using the To Do Tag

Though most note tags in OneNote 2010 are static icons, there is one tag that’s interactive—the To Do tag. Initially, it appears as a blank check box, but you can click this box to place a check mark in the box to indicate that a task has been completed.

The To Do tag is best applied to follow-up reminders, such as action items that were assigned to you during a business meeting, things your teacher told you to study for your next test, or the chores you’ve been assigned at home.

To create a to-do list with this tag, insert the To Do tag at the beginning of every line item in your list and then click the items you have completed. When all of the items on your list have been completed, you can delete the list from your notebook, or you can keep it as a record of your accomplishments.

 
Others
 
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Organizing the Pages and Sections in a Notebook (part 2) - Moving or Copying a Notebook Section, Merging One Notebook Section into Another
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Organizing the Pages and Sections in a Notebook (part 1) - Displaying the Hierarchy of a Notebook on the Navigation Bar
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Navigating Notebook Content with Links (part 2) - Notebooks list or click the Open Notebook button. Creating Wiki-Style Links to Other Locations in Your Notebook
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Navigating Notebook Content with Links (part 1) - Creating a Link to a Specific Notes Page, Creating a Link to a Specific Notebook Section
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Creating and Validating Process Diagrams - Reusing existing validation rules
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Creating and Validating Process Diagrams - Creating SharePoint workflow diagrams
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Creating and Validating Process Diagrams - Creating subprocesses
- Microsoft Access 2010 : The Linked Table Manager - Move and Update Table Links
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Linking to Another Type of Database (part 2) - Linking to SQL Server Databases
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Linking to Another Type of Database (part 1) - Link to Excel Spreadsheets, Link to Other Databases
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS