IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft Visio 2013 : Creating and Validating Process Diagrams - Understanding BPMN

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
12/27/2014 3:56:52 AM

Business Process Model and Notation (BPMN) was created to represent work processes in diagrams that are readily understandable by business people, yet are rich enough in detail to allow IT departments to translate process maps into technical specifications. The goal for BPMN is to enhance communication about processes across an organization. For automated processes, BPMN diagrams can serve as a bridge between process participants and the IT staff that build systems to support their work.

At one level, a BPMN diagram is like a flowchart or swimlane diagram. However, the symbol set is significantly larger than the one used for a conventional flowchart or swimlane diagram. This one fact leads both to strong advocacy for and strong resistance to BPMN.

Advocates assert that it is the combination of visual richness and underlying data attributes that allows BPMN diagrams to convey complex system and human interactions. Critics complain that the sheer number of symbols and symbol variants is off-putting to many people; they feel it makes diagrams more complex and less understandable to the business people who are half of the intended audience for BPMN.

Visio 2010 introduced a template for BPMN version 1.2 and it included stencils with dozens of shapes. Since the 1.2 version of the standard, the creators of BPMN have worked hard to make BPMN usable by a larger number of people. One result is that BPMN 2.0 defines a smaller working set of shapes and symbols that should be familiar to anyone who has created traditional flowcharts, and it is this version of BPMN on which the Visio 2013 template is based.

Note

The first thing to know about creating BPMN diagrams from the Visio Professional 2013 template is that there are four core shape types: Events, Activities, Gateways, and Connecting Objects, with multiple variations of each.

The BPMN 2.0 symbol set includes the following:

  • Three types of Events, classified as Start, Intermediate, and End, and represented by different kinds of circles as shown on the left in the following graphic.

    image with no caption

    Each of the BPMN shapes in Visio can display a modified appearance in order to represent a variation on the basic shape type. For example, each Event shape can show a trigger or result through the addition of an icon to one of the basic circles. The trio of images on the right in the preceding graphic represent a timer start event, a message intermediate event, and an error end event.

  • Two Activity types, Tasks and Sub-Processes, each of which has multiple variations as you will discover in the exercise that follows.

    image with no caption
  • Six Gateway types, all of which are variations of the Diamond shape.

    image with no caption
  • Three Connector types, representing Sequence Flows, Message Flows, and Associations between shapes (left to right in the following graphic), with optional condition attributes for Sequence Flows and direction attributes for Associations.

    image with no caption
 
Others
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Creating and Validating Process Diagrams - Understanding Visio rules, Validating flowcharts
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Linking to Tables in Another Access Database
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Importing ASCII Data
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Importing Spreadsheet Data
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Importing from Another Access Database
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Exporting to ASCII
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Exporting to an Excel Spreadsheet
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Exporting to Another Access Database
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Importing, Linking, and Opening Files
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Using Advanced Text Features - Addressing Envelopes
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS