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Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating a Table of Contents (part 1) - Adding a TOC to a Document - Inserting an Automatic Table of Contents

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10/15/2014 3:33:31 AM
A table of contents—or TOC, as we in the biz like to call it—is a list of a document’s sections. The TOC shows each section’s heading and page number.

Word can create a TOC from a document’s headings—that is, if the headings are formatted with styles that Word recognizes as heading styles. If your headings aren’t formatted with such styles, you’ll end up with an empty TOC.

The easiest way to add a TOC is to let Word insert a preformatted one on a separate page at the beginning of the document. After the table is in place, you can update it whenever you need to, in case you revise, add, delete, or move a heading.

Adding a TOC to a Document

Word provides a handful of automatic tables of contents, designed to complement your document’s theme. All you have to do is pick the design you like; Word automatically inserts the TOC and populates it with headings and page numbers. If you want more control over the table’s appearance, you can use the Table of Contents dialog box to create a custom TOC.

Inserting an Automatic Table of Contents

Before you create a table of contents, double-check your document’s headings to make sure they are formatted correctly.

1.
Place the insertion point at the beginning of the document and press Ctrl+Enter to insert a new, blank page there.

2.
Make sure the insertion point is on the new, blank page. Word inserts the TOC at the insertion point’s location.

3.
On the References tab, click Table of Contents. A drop-down list displays your options for inserting an automatic TOC, as shown in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Choosing an automatic, preformatted table of contents.


To see if any other automatic TOCs are available, click More Table of Contents From Office.com. A submenu appears, displaying additional designs you can insert directly from the Office.com website.


4.
Click one of the automatic table options. Word inserts the TOC at the insertion point’s location, as shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. An automatic table of contents, added to the beginning of a document.

Automatic TOCs typically have a simple design. The design includes a title formatted with the document’s Heading 1 style; the list of section headings is formatted basically like normal text. By default, automatic TOCs include only heading levels 1, 2, and 3.

A table of contents is one big field. If you start messing with it (by manually formatting it, for example), its behavior may surprise you. If you want to fiddle with your TOC, proceed with caution and be ready to hit the Undo button at any time. 

 
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