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Active Directory 2008 : Publishing Active Directory Objects (part 2) - Publishing Shared Folders, Querying Active Directory

1/20/2015 3:23:45 AM
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3. Publishing Shared Folders

Now that you've created and published a printer, you'll see how the same thing can be done to shared folders.

Exercise 2 walks through the steps required to create a folder, share it, and then publish it in Active Directory. This exercise assumes that you are using the C: partition; however, you may want to change this based on your server configuration.

Exercise 2: Creating and Publishing a Shared Folder

  1. Create a new folder in the root directory of your C: partition, and name it Test Share.

  2. Right-click the Test Share. Choose Share.

  3. In the File Sharing dialog box, enter the names of users you want to share this folder with. In the upper box, enter Everyone, then click Add. Note that Everyone appears in the lower box. Click in the Permission Level column next to Everyone and choose Contributor from the pop-up menu. Then click Share.



  4. You see a message that your folder has been shared. Click Done.



  5. Open the Active Directory Users And Computers tool. Expand the current domain, and right-click the RD OU. Select New => Shared Folder.

  6. In the New Object - Shared Folder dialog box, type Shared Folder Test for the name of the folder. Then type the UNC path to the share (for example, \\server1\Test Share). Click OK to create the share.




Once you have created and published the Shared Folder object, clients can use the My Network Places icon to find this object. The Shared Folder object will be organized based on the OU in which you created the Shared Folder object. When you use publication, you can see how this makes it easy to manage shared folders.

4. Querying Active Directory

So far you've created several Active Directory resources. One of the main benefits of having all of your resource information in Active Directory is that you can easily find what you're looking for using the Find dialog box. Recall that we recommended that you should always enter as much information as possible when creating Active Directory objects. This is where that extra effort begins to pay off.

Exercise 3 walks you through the steps to find specific objects in Active Directory.

Exercise 3: Finding Objects in Active Directory

  1. Open the Active Directory Users And Computers tool.

  2. Right-click the name of the domain and select Find.

  3. In the Find Users, Contacts, And Groups dialog box, select Users, Contacts, And Groups from the Find drop-down list. For the In setting, choose Entire Directory. This searches the entire Active Directory environment for the criteria you enter.

    Note that if this is a production domain and there are many objects, searching the whole directory may be a time-consuming and network-intensive operation.



  4. In the Name field, type admin and then click Find Now to obtain the results of the search.

  5. Now that you have found several results, you can narrow down the list. Click the Advanced tab of the Find Users, Contacts, And Groups dialog box.



    In the Field drop-down list, select User => Last Name. For Condition, select Starts With, and for Value, type admin. Click Add to add this condition to the search criteria. Click Find Now. Now only the Users that have the last name Admin are shown.

  6. When you have finished searching, close the Find Users, Contacts, And Groups dialog box and exit the Active Directory Users And Computers tool.


Using the many options available in the Find dialog box, you can usually narrow down the objects you're searching for quickly and efficiently. Users and systems administrators alike find this tool useful in environments of any size.

 
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