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Microsoft LynServer 2013 : Dependent Services and SQL - Office Web Apps Server

1/4/2015 8:53:43 PM
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Although not a Lync Server role in itself, a new server product that is very much a dependency for conferencing in Lync Server 2013 is the Office Web Apps Server. The purpose of the Office Web Apps Server is to deliver browser-based versions of Microsoft Office applications. The service is designed to work with products that support Web Application Open Platform Interface protocol (WOPI). Lync Server 2013 is among the first Microsoft applications to leverage the Office Web Apps Server, along with SharePoint 2013 and Exchange 2013. A single Office Web Apps Server instance or farm can provide browser-based file viewing and editing of Office documents for all of these applications.

For Lync Server 2013 specifically, one Office Web Apps Server is required for any deployment in which conferencing is enabled, and is used to deliver enhanced PowerPoint presentations that are streamed to the Front End Server. This provides several advantages over previous versions of Lync for such conferencing scenarios. For example, higher-resolution displays are now available, and a wider range of mobile devices are supported.


Note

With previous versions of Lync, PowerPoint presentations could be viewed by using either the embedded PowerPoint Viewer or dynamic HTML and Silverlight, depending on the client used. These methods presented several limitations; for example, the embedded PowerPoint viewer is available only for Windows, and Silverlight is not supported with many popular mobile devices. The Office Web Apps Server overcomes these limitations, and also supports newer PowerPoint features, such as slide transitions and embedded video.

System Requirements

Office Web Apps Server must be installed on a separate system in the environment, because it cannot be collocated with any of the Lync Server roles. High-availability is also supported for Office Web Apps Server and can be implemented via the installation of multiple servers and use of a hardware or software load-balancing solution. Whether a single system or multiple systems are deployed, each installation is referred to as an Office Web Apps Server farm. The following requirements and guidelines apply for systems used to host Office Web Apps Server:

• Supported operating systems are Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 and Windows Server 2012.

• Minimum hardware requirements are 4 x 64-bit cores, 8GB RAM, 80GB system hard drive.

• Server virtualization is supported.

• No other applications can be installed on the system, including any Lync roles, SQL, and Microsoft Office.

• For multiple server farms, any software or hardware load-balancing solution can be used.

A server certificate is also required in order to use Lync Server 2013 with Office Web Apps Server. The following requirements apply to the certificate that will be used:

• The certificate must be issued by a trusted CA (either internal or third-party).

• For single-server installations, the FQDN of the Office Web Apps Server must be included in the SAN (subject alternative name) field of the certificate.

• For load-balanced server farms, the certificate must be imported into the load balancer.

• The certificate must have an exportable private key.

• The Friendly name applied to the certificate must be unique within the Trusted Root Certificate Authorities store on the system running Office Web Apps Server, as this allows the cmdlet to determine which certificate is being targeted.


Note

Standard procedures can be used to request and install the certificate used for the Office Web Apps Server using the IIS Management Console, Certificate Authority Web Enrollment, or another method. However, the certificate binding should not be performed using the IIS Management Console. Rather, the certificate binding for Office Web Apps Server is performed using the same PowerShell command used to create the farm (New-OfficeWebAppsFarm), as detailed later.


Browser support for Office Web Apps Server includes Internet Explorer 6 through 9, as well as the latest public release versions of Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Apple Safari. There are also language packs available for English, Japanese, and Spanish, which must be installed on the Lync Front End Server as well as the Office Web Apps Server to be used.

The following are prerequisites for the installation of Office Web Apps Server:

• .NET Framework 4.5 (included with Windows Server 2012)

• Windows PowerShell 3.0 (included with Windows Server 2012)

• Windows Update KB2592525 (Windows Server 2008 R2 only)

• The Web Server (IIS) server role, along with the following role services:

Static Content

Default Document

ASP.NET (Windows Server 2008 R2) or ASP.NET 4.5 (Windows Server 2012)

.NET Extensibility (Windows Server 2008 R2) or .NET Extensibility 4.5 (Windows Server 2012)

ISAPI Extensions

ISAPI Filters

Server Side Includes

Windows Authentication

Request Filtering

IIS Management Console

Static Content Compression (recommended)

Dynamic Content Compression (recommended)

• The Ink and Handwriting Services feature

Office Web Apps Server Installation

The Office Web Apps Server software can be downloaded directly from the Microsoft site. After the prerequisite software has been installed along with the server certificate, the following procedure is used to install and then configure the Office Web Apps Server:

1. From the Office Web App Server media, double-click on the setup.exe file.

2. Read the licensing terms. If you agree, select I Accept the Terms of This Agreement and then click Continue.

3. At the File Location screen, either keep the default location for file installation on the C: volume, or enter an alternative path if desired. When finished, click Install Now.

4. After the file installation is complete, click Close.

5. Open Windows PowerShell, and execute the following command to import the Office Web Apps application into PowerShell: Import-Module OfficeWebApps.

6. Execute the following PowerShell command to create a single-server Office Web Apps Server farm, with the fully qualified name of the Office Web Apps Server used as the <servername> value, and the friendly name of the certificate used as the <CertFriendlyName> value:

New-OfficeWebAppsFarm -InternalURL https://<servername> -CertificateName
"<CertFriendlyName>"

If the farm is successfully created, the attributes of the new farm are automatically displayed in PowerShell, as shown in Figure 1.

Image

Figure 1. New Office Web Apps Server farm.

7. Verify that the Office Web Apps Server is installed and configured correctly by using a web browser to connect to the discovery URL at the following address, with the fully qualified name of the Office Web Apps Server used as the <servername> value: https://<servername>/hosting/discovery. If the installation is successful, a WOPI discovery XML file is displayed in the browser.

 
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