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Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 : Preserving information (part 3) - Creating a new search

11/21/2014 3:21:58 AM
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Creating a new search

Assuming that you know what information needs to be retained and keywords or other identifying phrases that can be used to locate matching data in user mailboxes, you can create a new search. From the In-Place eDiscovery And Hold section of EAC (shown in Figure 3), click New (+) to begin defining the search over four screens:

  1. Give the search a name; provide some information about why the search is necessary and what it hopes to find (Figure 4). Although Exchange won’t care what name you give (such as the “Great XYZ search for all things”), it’s better to use a name that makes sense to anyone involved in the search, administrators and legal staff alike. Ideally, the descriptive text entered for a search should let anyone who accesses the search understand its purpose. It’s a good idea to include information such as who initiated and authorized the search, the expected duration of the search period, and other pertinent details.

    Screen shot of the first screen used to create a new search. This screen allows the input of a name and description for the search. The search is called “Patent hold – Tailspin project,” with some descriptive text to tell administrators why the search has been initiated.

    Figure 4. Naming a new search

  2. Define the mailboxes the search covers. You can select All Mailboxes or specify a list of mailboxes, including groups. It’s always better to restrict the number of mailboxes as much as possible to help Exchange execute the search and retrieve search results. Usually, the number of mailboxes covered by a search is dictated by the legal team to meet the demands of a discovery action, and the preference of system administrators to restrict the number of mailboxes might be ignored. As shown on the screen on the left in Figure 5, adding hundreds or thousands of mailboxes through this screen would be time consuming, so it’s a good idea to use groups whenever possible. If you select All Mailboxes for a search, you cannot specify that an in-place hold should occur because this action could cause a huge amount of information to be retained in a large Exchange organization.

    A screen shot showing the second and third screens EAC presents to collect information about a new search. On the second screen (left), the source mailboxes are identified. All mailboxes can be included in a search or just specific mailboxes, as selected here. The third screen (right) collects details of the search query that filter results from source mailboxes. A simple query of “Patent OR Invention AND Tailspin” is used here.

    Figure 5. Specifying source mailboxes and the query for a search

  3. Specify the search query that locates matching items in user mailboxes. In the screen on the right in Figure 5, you can elect to search for all content or filter based on a query ranging from very simple (as in this case) to quite complex, depending on the needs of the search. In addition to the basic query, you can refine it by specifying:

    1. Start date and end date.

    2. The email addresses of users who sent messages.

    3. The addresses of people who were TO or CC recipients for messages.

    4. The exact types of items stored in mailboxes that are of interest to the search. For instance, you might only want to search for contents held in documents stored in mailboxes, such as attachments sent around for messages.

  4. The last stage is to decide whether to include an in-place hold for the search. This requires an enterprise CAL for every mailbox covered by the hold. Everything else to do with the search up to this point is covered by the standard CAL. When you set an in-place hold (Figure 6), Exchange monitors items in user mailboxes covered by the search for items that match the query and takes steps to ensure that no matching items are removed from the mailbox. This can be done indefinitely or for a specified period. In this case, you want items to be retained for approximately six years, or 2,192 days.

    The last stage of setting up a search is to decide whether to impose an in-place hold. The fourth screen EAC presents enables an administrator to set a hold for a specific period or indefinitely. This search has selected to hold items identified by the query for 2,192 days.

    Figure 6. Deciding whether items should be placed on hold

When you’ve completed all the screens, click Finish to have EAC save the new search. During the save process, EAC validates that the query you entered on the third screen is valid. It’s easy to enter search terms by using incorrect syntax until you become accustomed to KQL syntax; when you use incorrect syntax, you see the error shown in Figure 7. If this happens, close the error screen and go back to the screen where you entered the query and adjust its syntax. Eventually, perhaps after some additional trial and error, EAC can save the search and perform an initial estimate of the items that can be uncovered when the search is executed.

If the query entered for a search generates an error when the KQL parser examines its syntax, you see the kind of error shown here.

Figure 7. Detecting a problem with search syntax

 
Others
 
- Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 : Preserving information (part 2) - Searching mailbox content, In-place holds
- Microsoft Exchange Server 2013 : Preserving information (part 1) - Putting a mailbox on litigation hold
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