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Using the Windows 8 Interface : Working with Running Apps - Working with Notifications

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4/3/2014 4:30:41 AM

Shutting Down an App

Generally speaking, you don’t have to worry about shutting down Windows 8 apps because when they don’t have the focus they use very few system resources. However, if you’re having trouble with a Windows 8 app, or if you just want to make it easier to switch between the other running apps, then you need to know how to shut down a Windows 8 app. How you do this depends on whether you’re using a regular PC or a tablet PC:

Regular PC—Move the mouse pointer to the top of the screen, where it changes to a hand, and then click and drag the hand down. As you drag, the Windows 8 app window shrinks down to a thumbnail window. Keep dragging the window all the way to the bottom of the screen, and then release the mouse button. Alternatively, move the mouse pointer to the top-left corner to display the list of running apps, move the pointer over the app you want to close, right-click it, and then click Close. If all that just feels like a bit too much work, you can also just press Alt+F4 to close the current Windows 8 app.

Tablet PC—Place your finger at the top edge of the screen, and then slide down until the Windows 8 app window shrinks down to a thumbnail window. Keep dragging your finger to the bottom of the screen, and then release your finger.

Working with Notifications

If you’re a Windows old-timer, then you’re certainly all too familiar with the notification area in the taskbar, which displays banners whenever Windows or an application has information for you. Those notifications are still available in the Desktop app, but now they only work for desktop programs. Windows 8 and all Windows 8 apps use a new notification system. For example, you might add an appointment to the Calendar app and ask the app to remind you about it, and that reminder appears as a notification. Similarly, someone might send you a text message, and the Messaging app displays the text as a notification.


Tip

Notifications appear for only a few seconds. To keep a notification onscreen indefinitely, move your mouse pointer over the notification.


These notifications appear briefly in the upper-right corner of the screen. For example, Figure 1 shows the notification that appears when you insert a USB flash drive. In this case, Windows 8 is wondering what you want to do with the drive.

Image

Figure 1. Notifications appear in the upper-right corner of the screen.

To handle the notification, click it. Windows 8 then takes you to the app that generated the notification. If the notification was generated by Windows 8 itself, it displays more information. In the flash drive example, Windows 8 displays a list of options similar to the one shown in Figure 2.

Image

Figure 2. Click a notification, and Windows 8 either displays more information, as shown here, or switches to the app that generated the notification.

 
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