IT tutorials
 
Windows
 

Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Using Password Reset Disks, Running Programs as Administrator

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019
- How to active Windows 8 without product key
- Malwarebytes Premium 3.7.1 Serial Keys (LifeTime) 2019
3/3/2014 2:23:04 AM

1. Creating and Using Password Reset Disks

A password reset disk is an important part of any password-protected PC. It’s the only method of password recovery that allows you to retain all data in an account in the event of a forgotten password. Advanced features such as EFS (Encrypting File System) encryption, personal certificates, and stored network passwords can be recovered only by using a password reset disk.

The trick is that you need to create the password reset disk before you forget the password. You can’t do it after you’ve forgotten the password. Keep that disk in a safe place where you can find it when you need it, but where others can’t find it to gain unauthorized access to the administrative account.

A USB flash drive or memory card works equally well. However, a memory card will work only if your computer has slots for inserting a memory card.

Choosing a memory device for the password reset

A USB flash drive (also called a jump drive) is a small device that plugs into a USB port on your computer and looks and acts like a disk drive. A memory card is a storage device commonly used to save pictures in digital devices, like cameras or smartphones. If your computer has slots for such cards, you can slide a card into the slot and treat the card just as you would a USB flash drive. See Chapter 28 for more information.

To see examples and get an idea of cost, check out some online retailers. Then search the site for flash drive, jump drive, or memory card reader to view available products. If you’re looking at memory card readers, the kind that plug into a USB port will be the easiest to install. Many retail department stores that sell computer or office supplies also carry flash drives.

Creating the password reset disk

To create a password reset disk, log in to the password-protected administrative account you created. Connect a jump drive to a USB port, or put a spare memory card in a memory card slot. Launch the Password Reset Wizard by going to the Windows Start screen, pressing Windows+W, and typing Password Reset into the search field. Click the Create A Password Reset Disk item. Then follow these steps:

1. Read the first page of the wizard that opens and click Next.
2. Choose the drive letter that represents the jump drive or memory card; then click Next.
3. Type the password for the administrative account you’re currently logged into and click Next.
4. When the progress indicator is finished, click Next and then Finish.

Keep the drive or card in a safe place. If you use a jump drive that you also use for other purposes, make sure you don’t erase the userkey.psw file. That’s the file needed for password recovery.

Using the password reset disk

If you ever need to use the password reset disk to get into the administrative account, first start the computer and click the administrative account for which you created the password reset disk. Take a best guess at the password and press Enter.

If the password is rejected, insert the USB flash drive or memory card you created as a password reset disk. Wait a few seconds for Windows to recognize and register the item. Then click Reset Password under the password hint on the login screen.

Follow the instructions presented by the wizard that opens. You won’t be required to remember the original password. Instead, you create an entirely new password and hint for the account. Use that new password whenever you log in to the account from that point on.

2. Running Programs as Administrator

Most newer programs work with UAC’s privilege escalation on-the-fly. But sometimes a program won’t work, especially with older programs. You can run many programs with administrative privileges by right-clicking its startup icon and choosing Run As Administrator, as in the example shown in Figure 1.

FIGURE 1 Run a program as administrator.

image

If the option to run the program as an administrator is not available, then one of the following is true:

  • The program doesn’t require administrative privileges to run.
  • You are already logged into an administrative account.
  • The program is always blocked from running with elevated privileges.
 
Others
 
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Using User Accounts (part 2) - Turning UAC on and off
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Using User Accounts (part 1) - Understanding User Account Control
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Deleting User Accounts
- Windows Server 2012 : Business continuity for virtualized workloads (part 2) - Guidance on configuring the Hyper-V Replica Broker cluster resource
- Windows Server 2012 : Business continuity for virtualized workloads (part 1) - Implementing Hyper-V Replica
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 6) - Navigating through user account pages
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 5) - Changing the account picture
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 4) - Changing a user account type , Password-protecting an account
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 3) - Creating a new e-mail address for a new user account
- Windows 8 : Sharing and Securing with User Accounts - Creating and Managing User Accounts (part 2) - Creating a Microsoft user account
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS