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Windows 8 : Working with file systems (part 3) - Auditing access to securable objects by using SACLs

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10/10/2014 9:21:15 PM

Auditing access to securable objects by using SACLs

After the security of discretionary access lists is in place, NTFS allows only those user accounts or groups with the correct permissions to access objects. However, others within an environment might attempt to access files or folders. Often, being able to review or audit these access attempts can help ensure that those within the organization who need access to an object can get it and that those who do not need access cannot get it.

For example, many organizations have documents containing personal information or human resources–related information about their employees. Outside the legal and human resources departments, not many employees need access to this information.

When you use SACLs to audit objects within an environment, entries are recorded in the Windows event logs when events occur. If Orin attempts to access files within the Human Resources folder, Windows can write that attempt to the event log. Upon review, you will see that these access attempts happened, when they happened, and which user account was involved.

Note

WHEN TO AUDIT

Auditing for an object must be enabled for any actions to be logged. Consider carefully what you want to audit. Too much auditing will produce more information than is useful, whereas too little will not provide all the information necessary to monitor correctly what is occurring within your environment.

Auditing is configured in the Advanced Security Settings dialog box for an object and requires you to be an administrator or to have the appropriate permissions for the selected object to enable auditing. Figure 5 shows the Auditing tab of the Advanced Security Settings dialog box.

Enable auditing of objects

Figure 5. Enable auditing of objects

Configuring auditing is very similar in Windows 8 to configuring security permissions for an object. The only difference is that you are configuring which permissions (or actions on an object) to audit rather than access to an object. To configure auditing for an object, complete the following steps:

  1. Access the Auditing tab of the Advanced Security Settings dialog box for the object to be audited.

  2. Tap or click Add.

  3. Select a security principal to audit.

  4. Select the type of access attempts to include:

    • All Records all access attempts by this security principal for this object

    • Fail Records all failed attempts by this security principal to access this object

    • Success Records all successful attempts by this security principal to access this object

  5. Select the permissions to audit.

    Note

    PERMISSIONS FOR AUDITING

    When selecting permissions to include in auditing, these permissions determine the type of access that is audited for success or failure. If Read is selected, attempts to read an object will be audited for success or failure.

  6. Tap or click OK to save the access control entry.

  7. Tap or click OK in the Advanced Security Settings dialog box.

After security auditing has been configured for an object, Windows begins creating entries in the Security event log when conditions that meet the auditing settings are triggered.

Using auditing can be extremely helpful but, when auditing is overused, it can be difficult to manage. When you are considering auditing, keep in mind any policies put in place by your organization and work to ensure that the items audited are the items you need to know about rather than auditing everything. Many companies have policies covering auditing and access controls to ensure that they are used appropriately. This includes controls such as authorization of auditing particular information and reviewing collected information, and which information and access should be audited when particular events occur. Different events, such as litigation or investigation into employee actions internally, might require auditing to be handled differently.

 
Others
 
- Windows 8 : Working with file systems (part 2) - Inheritance and cumulative effectiveness
- Windows 8 : Working with file systems (part 1) - Security within the file system
- Windows 8 : Managing disks and storage (part 5) - Using Microsoft Drive Optimizer to organize data - The DiskPart utility
- Windows 8 : Managing disks and storage (part 4) - Using Microsoft Drive Optimizer to organize data - Check Disk (chkdsk)
- Windows 8 : Managing disks and storage (part 3) - Using Microsoft Drive Optimizer to organize data
- Windows 8 : Managing disks and storage (part 2) - Disk Defragmenter and Disk Cleanup
- Windows 8 : Managing disks and storage (part 1) - Using disk management
- Windows 8 : Sharing printers - Configuring shared printers, Configuring printing permissions
- Windows 8 : Sharing files and folders (part 6) - Understanding NTFS permissions - Identifying permissions, Taking ownership of a resource
- Windows 8 : Sharing files and folders (part 5) - Understanding NTFS permissions - Creating advanced security settings
 
 
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