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Windows Server 2012 : Managing Users and Data with Dynamic Access Control - Automatic File Classification

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1/14/2015 8:15:53 PM

As with auditing, file classification isn’t new to Windows Server but has been enhanced in Server 2012. File classification adds to a server administrator’s arsenal of management tools with powerful content classification rules.

With a classification rule, you can, for instance, automatically search against a specified set of files to look for the string “Company Confidential.” If the string is found in a file, you can set that file’s classification to High.

You can also use classification rules to detect sensitive data, such as documents containing Social Security numbers or patient healthcare information.

To deploy automatic file classification, first you need to create resource property definitions. From a domain controller, launch the ADAC. Click Dynamic Access Control, and then Resource Properties. Right-click a property (for instance, Impact), select Enable, and then enable the Personally Identifiable Information resource property.

Next, you create a Content Classification Rule. You do so on the file server with data you want to classify. From the server, as an administrator, run the following command in PowerShell:

Update-FSRMClassificationpropertyDefinition

This command syncs the property definitions enabled in the DC to file servers. Next, follow these steps:

  1. Launch File Server Resource Manager and expand Classification Management, right-click Classification Rules, and click Configure Classification Schedule. Check “Enable fixed schedule” and “Allow continuous classification for new files.” Select the day you want to run the rule and click OK.

  2. Right-click Classification Rules and select Create Classification Rule. Name your rule Company Confidential.

  3. In the Scope tab, click Add and select the folders to be included in the rule. In the Classification tab, configure the following:

    1. “Choose a method to assign a property to files” equals Content Classifier.

    2. “Choose a property to assign to files” equals Impact.

    3. “Specify a value” equals High.

  4. Next, click the Configure button under Parameters. In Expression Type, select String. Under Expression, type in Company Confidential. You can opt to make the string case-sensitive from the Expression Type drop-down list. Click OK.

  5. In the Evaluation Type tab, check “Re-evaluate existing property values” and select “Overwrite the existing values” when a conflict occurs between new and existing values. Click OK.

We now have a new classification rule set against a selected folder that looks for the string “Company Confidential” within documents in that folder. (See Figure 1.)

To verify that files are classified correctly, click Classification Management from the File Server Resource Manager. Right-click Classification Rules and then click “Run Classification with All Rules Now.”

This runs the Automatic Classification Report to check for classification rules you’ve established.

“Company Confidential” classification rule
Figure 1. “Company Confidential” classification rule
 
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