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Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Navigating Notebook Content with Links (part 2) - Notebooks list or click the Open Notebook button. Creating Wiki-Style Links to Other Locations in Your Notebook

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1/30/2015 8:29:39 PM

Creating a Link to a Specific Notebook

To create a link in your current notebook that will open another notebook you have open, follow these steps:

1.
On the navigation bar near the left side of the OneNote program window, right-click the icon of the notebook that the link should open when it is clicked.

2.
On the shortcut menu that appears, click Copy Link to Notebook (see Figure 3).

Figure 3. Right-clicking a notebook icon on the navigation bar lets you copy a link to that notebook, after which you can paste the link anywhere in your notes. It will automatically inherit the name of the notebook as the link text.


3.
Go to the notes page in the notebook where you want the link to appear, click to activate the cursor, and then press Ctrl+V to paste the link.

When pasting links to notebooks, OneNote automatically copies the notebook’s name into the link text so you don’t have to type it again. It also formats the link in blue, underlined text to indicate that it is clickable.

After the link has been pasted, clicking it will immediately open the notebook it points to. To return to the previous notebook, click the Back button on the Quick Access Toolbar near the upper-right corner of the OneNote program window.


If the notebook you want to link to isn’t shown on the navigation bar, click the File tab, click Open, and then either click the notebook from the Recently Closed Notebooks list or click the Open Notebook button.

Creating Wiki-Style Links to Other Locations in Your Notebook

If you’re familiar with wiki editing and it’s something you plan to do with OneNote, you’ll be happy to learn that OneNote supports the bracket syntax that lets you create navigational links to your pages, sections, and notebooks without using the interface.

To create a link to an existing place in your notebook, do the following:

1.
In your notes, where you want the link to appear, type [[ (two left brackets) to begin the link.

2.
Immediately following the opening brackets, type the name of the page, section, or notebook that you want to link to. This text must exactly match the name of your link target.

3.
To end the link, type ]] (two right brackets). As soon as you type the last bracket, the text will change to a blue, underlined, clickable link that will point to the page, section, or notebook name that you specified.

It’s important to note that, while wiki link names can have spaces between words, there should be no space immediately following the opening pair of brackets and preceding the closing pair of brackets.

If the name of your link target exists, the link that will point to it will appear underlined with a solid line, just like a normal link. If you type the title of a page or the name of a section or notebook that doesn’t exist, OneNote creates a new, blank page with the name you typed for the link and places this page in the current section of the notebook that you’re presently working in. Blank pages that are created and linked to in this way are formatted with a blue, broken underline (see Figure 4) to signal that, while the target page has been created, you’ll need to add content to this page at some point in the future.

Figure 4. Typing the title of a page that does not yet exist in your notebook as a wiki link will cause OneNote to create a new, blank page with that title so that you remember to add content to the page later. To help you spot empty pages that you have linked to, the link underline appears as a dotted line.


If OneNote creates a new, blank page as the target of a wiki link and you then delete this page, the link to that page remains. If you click the link in your notes, OneNote opens the deleted page in the notebook’s Recycle Bin, from which you can move it back into your notebook. The opportunity to restore pages in this way expires after 60 days from the day the page was originally deleted.


If you have both a section and a page in your notebook that have the same name, automatic wiki links will favor the page first. If you want to create a navigational link to both the page and the section that share the same name, you can use the wiki link syntax to create the link to the page and then use the manual link creation for the section by right-clicking the section tab, clicking Copy Link to Section, and then pasting that link into your notes at the location you want it to appear. Similarly, because pages are given preference, you cannot create a new section by typing a new name as a wiki link, as this will create a new page. To create a new section that you can then link to, right-click any existing section tab at the location the new section should appear, and then click New Section on the shortcut menu.

As is the case with manually created navigational links, wiki links that you create from typed text are automatically maintained even if you move pages and sections around in your notebook after the links have been created. Similarly, your navigational links won’t break if you change the names of the pages, sections, or notebooks to which they point. OneNote automatically updates and maintains them as needed.

If, for some reason, you prefer to create navigational links by selecting their destination from a list, you can use the quick filing menu to create a link. To do this, click in the line of text where you want to create your link and then press Ctrl+K to display the Link dialog box. In the lower half of the dialog box, navigate to and then select the destination of the link. When you click OK, OneNote inserts a formatted link to the page, section, or notebook that you selected.

Now that you know how to organize information in your notebooks by adding optional navigation, it’s time to learn how you can move things around when needed.

 
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