IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft Onenote 2010 : Organizing and Searching Notes - Organizing Items on a Page (part 2) - Organizing Notes Chronologically

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
1/2/2015 8:33:59 PM

Organizing Notes Chronologically

Although the date and time stamp that appears near the top of each notes page tells you when that page was first created, the actual notes on the page aren’t always created on the same day. You might want or need to know when a specific line or paragraph of text was added or updated.

For example, if you’re consolidating notes from multiple notes pages or note containers, and you want to organize the seemingly random paragraphs in chronological order (for example, a transcription of events that happened at a seminar), you can look up a hidden date and time stamp that OneNote automatically applies to each paragraph of text when it is created or edited. When merging note containers and consolidating notes, you can use this information to put your text into the right order.

To check the hidden date and time stamp of a paragraph of text, follow these steps:

1.
Move the mouse pointer over the line of text in the second note container until you see the four-headed arrow icon next to it.

2.
Right-click the arrow icon.

3.
At the bottom of the shortcut menu that appears, make note of the author of the selected text and the date and time when it was created or last edited (see Figure 3).

Figure 3. When right-clicking the arrow icon for any of the paragraphs in a note container, this menu appears. The last line item displays the text’s author and the date and time when the text was created or last updated.


This information is hidden because it’s actually metadata—a fancy word for “data about data” (or “information about information”). This kind of additional information exists in most other computer files, too. For example, in Microsoft Word 2010, you can display the properties of a document, which tell you all kinds of interesting information, such as how long the document was edited, how often it was saved, and so on.

Similarly, when you import a photo from your digital camera, its metadata tells you what camera you used to create the picture, what exposure (or ISO) setting you used, and other items of interest. Metadata is typically hidden from normal view because it is not always needed. You can consider it as a sort of “on-demand” feature. If you need to know this information, you can easily look it up.

The hidden date and time stamp of text assumes that the computer used to originally create or update this text was correctly set to the current, local time. The author’s name shown in front of the date and time stamp is taken from the optional personalization you can apply to all of the programs in Microsoft Office 2010. If you didn’t enter your name during installation or you want to update the name on a specific computer, click the File tab in OneNote and then click Options. In the OneNote Options dialog box that opens, in the General category, look under the Personalize Your Copy of Microsoft Office heading and then enter the name and initials of the person using that particular copy of OneNote. If two or more people use OneNote on the same computer, different names can be used for OneNote personalization with each Windows user account that you’ve created.


Using Rule Lines and Gridlines to Organize Objects on a Page

Another way to organize information on the current page is to use the optional rule lines or gridlines that can change a blank notes page to resemble a paper notepad or college-ruled notebook. This can be useful if you’re trying to better align paragraphs of handwritten notes or when you want to visually organize other objects on your page, such as multiple screen clippings you’ve captured or pictures you’ve inserted on the page.

To apply rule lines or gridlines to the current page, follow these steps:

1.
On the ribbon, click the View tab.

2.
In the Page Setup group, click Rule Lines.

3.
On the pop-up menu that appears, click a style under either the Rule Lines or Grid Lines heading (see Figure 4). If you don’t like the result, simply repeat the previous steps and choose another style, or click None to remove the last style you applied.

Figure 4. To more precisely align text and objects on the page, you can apply rule lines or gridlines to appear on your page background—either temporarily or permanently.


You don’t have to keep rule lines or gridlines displayed if you only want to use them temporarily to line up the notes and objects on your pages. When you’re done organizing the layout of your page the way you want, follow the previous steps and apply the style labeled None to remove the lines again.


If you do decide to keep rule lines or gridlines displayed permanently, you can change their color to match that of your text and visuals on your page. From the Rule Lines menu, click Rule Line Color and then click the color you want.

 
Others
 
- Microsoft Onenote 2010 : Organizing and Searching Notes - Organizing Items on a Page (part 1) - Merging Note Containers on a Page
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Creating and Validating Process Diagrams - Creating and validating BPMN diagrams
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Creating and Validating Process Diagrams - Understanding BPMN
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Creating and Validating Process Diagrams - Understanding Visio rules, Validating flowcharts
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Linking to Tables in Another Access Database
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Importing ASCII Data
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Importing Spreadsheet Data
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Importing from Another Access Database
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Exporting to ASCII
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Sharing Data with Other Applications - Exporting to an Excel Spreadsheet
 
25 Inspiring Game of Thrones Quotes
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS