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Microsoft Onenote 2010 : Using Tables to Organize Information (part 4) - Selecting a Row in a Table,Selecting a Single Cell in a Table

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1/2/2015 8:39:12 PM

Selecting a Row in a Table

You can quickly select a row in a table by doing the following:

1.
Click any cell in your table.

2.
On the ribbon, above the Layout tab, click Table Tools.

3.
In the Select group, click Select Rows.

To select a row more quickly, right-click any table cell, click Table on the shortcut menu that appears, and then click Select Rows.


If the plural form in the Select Rows command seems out of place, it’s because you can use this command to select multiple rows, not just the current row. To do this, click any cell in the first row that you want to select, hold down the Shift key, and then click any cell in the last row that you want to select. When you now use the Select Rows command, either on the ribbon or on the right-click menu, OneNote will select all of the rows between and including the rows of the two cells you selected.

After any row is selected, you can format it with the font, font size, font style, text color, or cell alignment you want.

Selecting a Single Cell in a Table

You can quickly select any cell in a table by doing the following:

1.
Click any cell in your table.

2.
On the ribbon, above the Layout tab, click Table Tools.

3.
In the Select group, click Select Cell.

To select a cell more quickly, right-click any table cell, click Table on the shortcut menu that appears, and then click Select Cell. An even faster way to select a single table cell is by triple-clicking it.


Aligning Text Within a Table Cell

After you have selected any cell, row, or column in your table, you can change the alignment of text or objects within the selected cells.

To align text within a table cell, do the following:

1.
Select the cells whose text you want to align.

2.
On the ribbon, above the Layout tab, click Table Tools.

3.
In the Alignment group, click the alignment you want (Align Left, Center, Align Right).

To change the alignment of cells more quickly, select the cells you want, and then on the Home tab, click the arrow next to the Paragraph Alignment button. On the pop-up menu that appears, click Align Left, Center, or Align Right. The buttons in these two different locations do the same thing. Keyboard shortcuts are also available for two of these commands: Press Ctrl+L to align text in the selected cells to the left or press Ctrl+R to align it to the right. A keyboard shortcut for centering text within selected table cells is not available.


Showing and Hiding Table Borders

When you create a table in OneNote, its cells are divided by a visible grid to help keep the information in the table cells visually separated. In most cases, this makes the information easier to read.

If you use tables as a page layout or spacing tool for information or objects on your notes page, you can hide the table borders.

To hide table borders, do the following:

1.
Click any cell in the table whose borders you want to hide.

2.
On the ribbon, above the Layout tab, click Table Tools.

3.
In the Borders group, click Hide Borders.

The Hide Borders command is an On/Off toggle, which means you can restore table borders by repeating the previous steps. Clicking the Hide Borders command again when it is selected (the button on the ribbon will appear orange) turns off the option.

To hide table borders more quickly, right-click any table cell, click Table on the shortcut menu that appears, and then click Hide Borders. To quickly show the borders again, repeat the same steps. Clicking Hide Borders on the shortcut menu again turns off the option.


Because table borders disappear completely when you do this, it’s the very last thing you should do after you have formatted the table contents the way you want them to appear.

When the borders of a table are hidden, you can still navigate through or select its individual cells, if necessary. Click anywhere in the borderless table to activate any cell and then use the directional arrow keys on your keyboard to go to the cell you want. You can also use the mouse to interact with any part of a borderless table. For example, moving the mouse pointer over an invisible column border will display the column resize pointer. In most cases, though, it’s simply easier to temporarily display the borders again if you need to reformat any part of a table.


 
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