IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft Project 2010 : Working with Resources - Understanding Resource Types and Other Factors, Adding Resources to Your Project

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
2/2/2015 3:12:12 AM

Understanding Resource Types and Other Factors

Project supports three different types of resources:

  • Work resources are the people and equipment that will do the work to complete tasks in your project. For example, a developer for your product is a work resource, and the server he uses to check code is also a work resource.

  • Material resources are the things that the work resources need to complete tasks in your project. For example, if one of the work resources for your project is a plotter, you may also want to include material resources for paper and toner. Or, if you’re planning a construction project, you may want to include cement, rebar, lumber, and other supplies for your project as material resources.

  • Cost resources are the fees associated with getting tasks in your project done, which aren’t associated with the amount of work put into a project or how long the project lasts. For example, if a task in your project requires a business trip, you would include the airfare and hotel charges as cost resources.

Cost resources are different from the costs incurred by work resources doing work on your project, or the costs incurred as you use material resources (supplies) to get work done.


In addition to these three types of resources, keep a couple other considerations in mind when planning your project:

  • Will other projects use the same resources as my project? If the resources you’ll be using in your project can also be used in other projects in your organization, and if you are running Project Professional 2010 with Project Server, you can choose to make resources in your project enterprise resources or assign enterprise resources to your project. An enterprise resource is a resource that is included in a list of all resources in your organization (the enterprise resource pool). By assigning resources from the enterprise resource pool, you are able to account for work that your resources are doing on other projects, not just your own. This helps track resource availability and enables you to more accurately plan your project within the broader scope of your organization.

  • Do I know exactly who/what will be working on my project? If you know you’ll need a specific kind of resource on your project, such as a developer or a roofer, but you’re not sure exactly who or what will be doing the work (that is, you don’t know which person or which server), you can use generic resources to plan your project. By assigning generic resources, you can identify just how many people or things your project will need, and then you can substitute them later for the specific people, equipment, or other resources that will be doing the work you have laid out in your project plan.


Adding Resources to Your Project

The process for adding a resource to your project is different, depending on whether you’re adding a resource used only in your project (a local resource) or an enterprise resource available for assignment throughout your organization (Project Professional only).

To add a local resource to your project, follow these steps:

1.
On the View tab, in the Resource Views group, click Resource Sheet.

2.
Type the name of your work, material, or cost resource in the Resource Name column. If you are adding a generic resource, type a generic label for the resource, such as Roofer, Web Server, or Designer.

3.
Choose whether the resource is a work, material, or cost resource using the list in the Type column.

4.
If you chose Material in the Type column, type the unit label for the material resource in the Material Label column. For example, if you are adding fabric as a material resource, you might choose to type yards in the Material Label column.

5.
If you want the resource to be part of a larger group of resources, such as employees in the same role or in the same department, type the name of the group in the Group column.

6.
Type the maximum amount of the resource’s time that can be spent on the project, as a decimal or percentage of the resource’s time, in the Max Units column. For example, if a resource is working half-time on your project and half-time on other projects, type 50% or .5 in the Max Units column for that resource.

If you are adding a generic resource, you can use the Max Units column to identify how many of that generic resource you have available for your project. For example, if you have enough work for three full-time developers working on tasks in your project, you can enter 300% in the Max Units column for the Developer generic resource.


7.
If appropriate, type the cost information for the resource in the following fields:

  • Std Rate— Type the standard cost rate for the resource. That is, how much the resource is paid for specific time units, such as an hourly, daily, or yearly rate.

  • Ovt Rate— Type the overtime cost rate for the resource. That is, how much the resource is paid for overtime work in specific time units, such as per minute, per hour, or per day.

  • Cost/Use— Type a per-use cost for the resource, if applicable. For example, several tasks in your project will use an industrial printer. Each time you use the printer, there is an initial cost-per-use fee of $250 on top of the standard daily rate.

  • Accrue at— Choose when the costs will be accrued for the resource. By default, this is set to Prorated, meaning that the costs for this resource will be accrued as work is scheduled and actual work is reported on a task. If you choose Start, costs for the entire task will be accrued at the beginning of a resource’s assignment, based on the scheduled work for the task. If you choose End, costs for the resource’s task assignment will not be accrued until the remaining work for the task is set to 0.

8.
If you are adding a generic resource, on the Resource tab, in the Properties group, click Information.

9.
Select the Generic check box and click OK.

Here’s how to add an enterprise resource to your project, using Project Professional 2010:

1.
On the Resource tab, in the Insert group, click Add Resources, and then click Build Team from Enterprise.

2.
Use the Existing filters box to filter the list of enterprise resources.

3.
Select the Available to work check box to narrow the list of resources to only those that are available to work a certain number of hours during a specific time range.

4.
To find generic resources, click + to expand Customize filters and then define a filter:

  • Field Name— Generic

  • Test— Equals

  • Values— Yes

5.
Click Apply Filter to display only generic resources.

6.
After you decide which enterprise resources you want to add to your project, press Ctrl and click each resource in the Enterprise Resource column and then click Add.

7.
Click OK to add the selected resources to your project.
 
Others
 
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Searching Notes (part 4) - Troubleshooting Problems with Search
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Searching Notes (part 3) - Searching for Text with the Search Results Task Pane
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Searching Notes (part 2) - Searching for Text on the Current Page, Searching for Text with Instant Search
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Searching Notes (part 1) - Turning Audio Search On or Off, Turning Text Recognition in Pictures On or Off
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Prioritizing and Categorizing Notes with Tags (part 2) - Search for Tagged Notes, Removing a Tag from a Note
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Prioritizing and Categorizing Notes with Tags (part 1) - Applying a Tag to a Note
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Organizing the Pages and Sections in a Notebook (part 2) - Moving or Copying a Notebook Section, Merging One Notebook Section into Another
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Organizing the Pages and Sections in a Notebook (part 1) - Displaying the Hierarchy of a Notebook on the Navigation Bar
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Navigating Notebook Content with Links (part 2) - Notebooks list or click the Open Notebook button. Creating Wiki-Style Links to Other Locations in Your Notebook
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Navigating Notebook Content with Links (part 1) - Creating a Link to a Specific Notes Page, Creating a Link to a Specific Notebook Section
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS