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Microsoft Lync Server 2013 : SQL Server Dependencies - Lync Database Requirements, Installing SQL Server for Lync

2/3/2015 7:17:27 PM
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Lync Database Requirements

The first SQL database required for a new Lync installation is the Central Management Store (CMS), which is used to store the configuration data that is replicated to all the Lync servers in the environment. Beyond the CMS, the Front End Servers also require databases for persistent and dynamic user data, and address book information. Additional databases are also used depending on specific optional features that might be deployed, such as the Response Group and Call Park services. Collectively, these databases are referred to as the Lync Back End databases, and the two database platforms that can be used for these are SQL 2008 R2 and SQL 2012.


Tip

Either the Enterprise or Standard Editions of both SQL 2008 R2 and SQL 2012 can be used for the Lync Back End databases. Both editions also support SQL mirroring, which is the recommended high-availability solution for the Lync 2013 Back End databases.


Depending on the topology, it is also possible to collocate databases that are used by other Lync server roles with Lync Back End databases. For example, the Archiving and Monitoring Server roles both have their own databases, and both can be installed on the same SQL instance as the Lync Back End databases. The Persistent Chat databases can also be installed on the same SQL system with the Lync Back End databases. The decision as to whether to collocate these databases on the same SQL system with each other or with the Lync Back End databases is largely a matter of whether performance requirements can be met. With that in mind, these configuration decisions need to be considered on a case-by-case basis. All the database collocation possibilities mentioned previously are applicable to Enterprise Edition pools only. This is because the Standard Edition uses SQL Express, which does not meet the database requirements for any of the other Lync server roles.


Note

Microsoft supports installation of the Back End, Monitoring, Archiving, and Persistent Chat databases on the same SQL Server, and these can use either the same SQL instance or separate instances. However, only one of each type of database is supported on any given SQL Server. For many Lync deployments, only one of each type of database is actually required, however there are circumstances in which more than one of a certain database might be needed. For example, the Monitoring Server role can only be associated with a single Front End pool. In a Lync environment with multiple pools, this means that several Monitoring Server databases, and therefore several SQL Server systems, would be needed to provide monitoring for the entire environment.

Installing SQL Server for Lync

As noted earlier, for an Enterprise Edition pool, SQL Server 2008 R2 and SQL Server 2012 are the supported Back End database platforms. Since it is the most recent database release, this section provides step-by-step procedures for installing SQL 2012 in preparation for hosting the Lync Server 2013 Back End databases. However, installation of SQL 2008 R2 for Lync involves very similar steps. To install SQL Server 2012 in preparation for Lync Enterprise Edition, perform the following steps:

1. Double-click setup.exe on the SQL 2012 DVD.

2. If the .NET Framework is not already present, an installation prompt appears. Click OK to enable installation of the .NET Framework Core.

3. When the SQL Server Installation Center displays, as shown in Figure 1, click Installation in the left pane, and then click New SQL Server Stand-Alone Installation or Add Features to an Existing Installation.

Image

Figure 1. SQL Server Installation Center.

4. A first round of setup support rule checks now runs automatically, identifying any problems that might need to be corrected before the installation continues. If any failures occur, click the status for additional information and follow the recommended steps to remediate the problem. After all rule checks pass successfully, click OK.

5. At this point the setup files are installed, followed by a second set of setup support rule checks. If any failures occur, click the status for additional information and follow the recommended steps to remediate the problem. After all rule checks pass successfully, click Next.

6. At the Product Key screen, enter your product key and click Next.

7. Read the licensing terms. If you agree, select I Accept the License Terms and then click Next.

8. When the Setup Role screen appears, choose SQL Server Feature Installation and click Next.

9. The Feature Selection screen now appears, as shown in Figure 2. For a Lync Enterprise Edition installation, Database Engine Services is the only feature that is required. However, Management Tools - Basic is recommended for maintenance and troubleshooting purposes, and SQL Server Replication should be installed if SQL mirroring will be used for high-availability. Other features can be installed if desired. After selecting the features to be installed, either keep the default installation paths for SQL shared features or enter an alternative path for these files, and click Next.

Image

Figure 2. SQL Feature Selection.

10. Installation rules are now checked to identify any problems that block installation. If any failures occur, click the status for additional information and follow the recommended steps to remediate the problem. After all rule checks pass successfully, click Next.

11. At the Instance Configuration screen, select the option for Default Instance, and keep the default settings for Instance ID and Instance root directory. Click Next.

12. At the Disk Space Requirements screen, review the disk space usage summary and click Next.

13. The Server Configuration screen now appears, as shown in Figure 3. For Lync, the default configuration of using built-in service accounts will suffice; however, dedicated domain-based accounts can be chosen if these have been configured. If dedicated accounts will be used, enter the account names and passwords for each service. Leave the startup types at their default values, and click Next.

Image

Figure 3. SQL service accounts configuration.

14. At the Database Engine Configuration screen, select the Authentication Mode for the server, either the default setting of Windows Authentication Mode or Mixed Mode, which allows both SQL and Windows accounts to be used. If Mixed Mode is selected, enter the initial password for the SQL system administrator (sa) account.


Tip

Windows authentication is generally considered to be the more secure authentication method for SQL. However, mixed mode does provide an additional method of connecting to SQL in the event that there are problems communicating with Active Directory, which can be useful for troubleshooting purposes. The decision of which authentication mode to use should therefore be made based on the security policy of the organization.


15. Still on the Database Engine Configuration screen, at the bottom of the screen click Add, and then use the object picker to select the administrative groups and users that will be granted unrestricted access to the database engine. For many organizations, the built-in Administrators group on the local server will be added here, as shown in Figure 4. click Next.

Image

Figure 4. SQL authentication and administrator accounts configuration.

16. Still on the Database Engine Configuration screen, click the Data Directories tab to view the default locations for the data root directory, user database directory, temp database directory, backup directory, and the user and temp database log file directories. Either keep the default locations on the C: volume for each of these, or, if dedicated volumes have been created in advance, edit the locations to reflect these alternative locations. When finished, click Next.

17. At the Error Reporting screen, select whether Windows and SQL Server Error Reports will be sent to Microsoft, and then click Next.

18. Installation configuration rules are now checked to identify any problems that block installation. If any failures occur, click the status for additional information and follow the recommended steps to remediate the problem. After all rule checks have passed successfully, click Next.

19. At the Ready to Install screen, review the configuration summary to verify that the correct selections have been made. When finished, click Install to proceed with the installation.

20. When the installation is completed, click Close.


Tip

After the SQL installation is complete, use Windows Update to search for SQL-related updates.

 
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