IT tutorials
 
Gadgets
 

Focusrite Red 1 500 Series Mic Pre

2/5/2014 4:57:56 PM
- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019 (All Versions)
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire

Focusrite’s first 500 Series module is a faithful version of the original and legendary Red 1 preamplifier.

Focusrite’s foray into the 500 Series format is with the Red 1 preamp. Originally released in 1993 with its striking red face-plate, the Red 1 became quite popular as a 2U quad-channel pre and was later released as a stereo pre, the Red 8. How did Focusrite squeeze its signature pre into the 500 format? Read on.

Title: Focusrite Red 1 500 Series Mic Pre - Description: Focusrite Red 1 500 Series Mic Pre

Focusrite Red 1 500 Series Mic Pre

Features

In homage to the original Red 1’s quarter-inch-thick front panel, the Red 1 500 starts with an eighth-inch-thick, red anodized aluminum front panel with backlit analog port-hole-style VU meter, switchable between 0 VU = +4dBu or +10 dBu. A Grayhill gold-plated military-grade gain pot plus phantom power and polarity reverse switches comprise its minimalistic front panel. Gain is selectable in 6 dB increments, starting with a -6 dB pad setting and ranging up to +60 dB. Like the ISA console preamp and original Red 1, the Red 1 500’s transformers include a Lundahl LL1538 for input and a custom Carnhill on output, which is capable of driving long cable runs. Thanks to its fully-encased metal chassis and thoughtful design, the Red 1 500 provides superb common mode rejection specs, low noise and wide bandwidth (10 Hz to 140 kHz). Gain comes from two sources: 14 dB from the input transformer with a fixed input impedance of 1.4 kHz (the same spec as the original ISA preamp) and 46 dB from the amplifier stage.

In Use

My own testing of the Red 1 500 included comparisons with other high-quality preamps, including the Amek 9098, Focusrite ISA 428, Lola 500 (a hybrid Neve/990 op-amp design) and other 500 Series pres. Tracking instrumentation included various vocals, acoustic guitars, electric guitars, drums and cello via a variety of micro-phones. The Red 1’s 66 dB of overall gain proved just enough for ribbon mics on quieter instruments, while the starting point of -6 worked great with loud instruments like drums and electric guitars; it eliminated the need for a separate pad switch. The overall sound of the Red 1 was fast and punchy. The Red 1 500 worked great in just about any setting, but my favorite applications generally involved condenser microphones. For instance, an omni condenser via Red 1 on acoustic guitar was just what I was looking for: full, clearly detailed and not harsh, with extremely low noise. In comparison to other pres, the Lundahl appeared to keep the top end smooth and silky without added low or mid-based presence peaks. The few minuses I can note are basically what the Red 1 500 doesn’t have: there’s no quarter-inch instrument input, no high pass filter and no fine output gain adjustment. These missing elements may not matter to you, depending on your signal chain.

Title: Red 1 500, with its signature red anodised aluminium front panel - Description: Focusrite Red 1 500 Series Mic Pre

Red 1 500, with its signature red anodized aluminum front panel

Summary

Focusrite has successfully squeezed it’s amazing ISA preamp into 500 Series parameters, all done with the largest out-put tranny I’ve ever seen in such a module. Hopefully Focusrite will release more of its designs for the format. Based on my own experience, the Red 1 500 seems to be faithful to the original in every way. Anywhere you desire a smooth frequency response yet clear, punchy and detailed sound, it delivers.

Acknowledgement: Special thanks to Radial Engineering for the extended use of its superb Workhorse 500 rack during this review.

Focusrite has successfully squeezed it’s amazing ISA preamp into 500 Series parameters, all done with the largest out-put tranny I’ve ever seen in such a module.

Focusrite has successfully squeezed it’s amazing ISA preamp into 500 Series parameters, all done with the largest out-put tranny I’ve ever seen in such a module.

Specifications

·         Maximum Output: +25.5dBu (20Hz–20kHz)

·         Maximum Input: >+28dBu (200Hz–13kHz), >26dBu (160Hz–20kHz)

·         Frequency Response:

Ø  Deviation at 30dB gain (20Hz–20kHz): ±0.1dB

Ø  Bandwidth (–3dB) at 30dB gain: 103 kHz

Ø  Range at 60dB gain (–0.5dB): 125Hz–24kHz

Ø  Bandwidth (–3dB) at 60dB gain: 32Hz–75kHz

·         Output Noise (min gain):

Ø  –104.5dBu CCIR-RMS

Ø  –107dBu A-wgt

·         EIN (max gain, 150 Ohm):

Ø  –124.5dBu CCIR-RMS

Ø  –128dBu A-wgt

·         Harmonic Distortion (30dB gain, –30dBu input)

Ø  Third Harmonic: –101dB (0.0009%)

Ø  Second Harmonic: –88.5dB (0.0038%)

Ø  THD+N (20 kHz bandwidth): –88dB (0.0039%)

·         CMRR (24dB gain, –4dBu input, 1kHz)

Ø  Common mode test: 102dB

Ø  IEC 60268-3:2000 test: 89dB

 

 

 
Others
 
- PMC Twenty 23 - An Open, Engaging And Communicative Loudspeaker
- BenQ RL2455HM Gaming Monitor - A Feast For A Gamer's Eyes
- Equator Audio D8 Studio Monitors
- Eventide H9 Harmonizer Multi-Effects Pedal
- Yamaha STAGEPAS 600i All-In-One Portable PA System
- The MeMO Pad HD 7 - A Stylish And Portable 7-Inch Value Tablet
- Panasonic TX-L65WT600 - The Best 4K Ultra HD TV
- Sony HAP-Z1ES - A Hi-Rez Media Streamer (Part 2)
- Sony HAP-Z1ES - A Hi-Rez Media Streamer (Part 1)
- Hi-Fi For The Long-Haul (Part 4)
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS