IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft Acecss 2010 : Power Control Techniques (part 4) - Aligning Objects to One Another, Sizing Your Controls

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019 (All Versions)
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
3/12/2015 9:20:37 PM
Aligning Objects to One Another

Access makes it easy to align objects. Figure 6 shows several objects that aren’t aligned. Notice that the attached labels of three of the objects are selected. If you align the attached labels, the controls (in this case, text boxes) remain in their original positions. If you also select the text boxes, the text boxes try to align with the attached labels. Because Access doesn’t allow the objects to overlap, the text boxes end up immediately next to their attached labels. To left-align any objects (even objects of different types), you select the objects you want to align and then choose Left from the Align drop-down in the Sizing & Ordering group on the Arrange tab of the Ribbon. Access aligns the selected objects (see Figure 7). You can align the left, right, top, or bottom edges of any objects on a form.

Figure 6. A form before objects are aligned.

Figure 7. A form after objects are aligned.

You shouldn’t confuse the Align feature on the Arrange tab of the Ribbon with the Align tools (that is, Align Left, Center, and Align Right) on the Home tab of the Ribbon. Whereas the Align feature on the Arrange tab of the Ribbon aligns objects one to the other, the Align tools on the Home tab of the Ribbon justify the text inside an object.


 

Sizing Your Controls

Just as there are several ways to move objects, you have several options for sizing objects. When you select an object, you can use each handle, except for the handle in the upper-left corner of the object, to size the object. The handles at the top and bottom of the object enable you to change the object’s height, and the handles at the left and right of the object let you change the object’s width. You can use the handles in the upper-right, lower-right, and lower-left corners of the object to change the width and height of the object simultaneously. To size an object, you place the mouse pointer over a sizing handle, click, and drag. You can select several objects and size them all simultaneously. Each of the selected objects increases or decreases in size by the same percentage; their relative sizes stay intact. You use the upper-left handle to move an object independent of its attached label. This means, for example, that you can place the label associated with a text box above the text box, rather than to its left.

Access offers several powerful methods of sizing multiple objects, which you access by selecting Size/Space from the Sizing & Ordering group on the Arrange tab of the Ribbon:

  • To Fit— Sizes the selected objects to fit the text within them

  • To Grid— Sizes the selected objects to the nearest gridlines

  • To Tallest— Sizes the selected objects to the height of the tallest object in the selection

  • To Shortest— Sizes the selected objects to the height of the shortest object in the selection

  • To Widest— Sizes the selected objects to the width of the widest object in the selection

  • To Narrowest— Sizes the selected objects to the width of the narrowest object in the selection

Probably the most confusing of the options is To Fit. This option is somewhat deceiving because it doesn’t perfectly size text boxes to the text within them. In today’s world of proportional fonts, it isn’t possible to perfectly size a text box to the largest possible entry it contains. Generally, however, you can visually size text boxes to a sensible height and width. You use a field’s Size property to limit what’s typed in the text box. If the entry is too large to fit in the allocated space, the user can scroll to view the additional text. As the following tip indicates, the To Fit option is much more appropriate for labels than it is for text boxes.

To quickly size a label to fit the text within it, you can select the label and then double-click any of its sizing handles, except the sizing handle in the upper-left corner of the label.


 
Others
 
- Microsoft Acecss 2010 : Power Control Techniques (part 3) - Moving Things Around
- Microsoft Acecss 2010 : Power Control Techniques (part 2) - Selecting Form Objects
- Microsoft Acecss 2010 : Power Control Techniques (part 1) - Add Fields to a Form, Add Multiple Fields to a Form at the Same Time
- Microsoft Project 2010 : Strategies for Analyzing Costs
- Microsoft Project 2010 : Reviewing the Project-Level Statistics
- Microsoft Project 2010 : Reviewing the Big Picture (Critical Path Analysis)
- Microsoft Project 2010 : Performing a Schedule Reality Check (part 2) - Looking for Technique Errors
- Microsoft Project 2010 : Performing a Schedule Reality Check (part 1) - Looking for Logic Errors, Schedule Estimation Methods
- Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Grouping and Changing the Order of Objects - Group and Ungroup Objects
- Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Rotating and Flipping Objects
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS