IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft Project 2010 : Project on the Internet (part 2) - Hyperlinking to Information - Creating a Hyperlink to a Location in the Project File

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
10/16/2014 9:37:39 PM

Creating a Hyperlink to a Location in the Project File

Hyperlinking from one place in your Project file to another is a great way to find related tasks or resources. A hyperlink can take you from a design task to the corresponding development task or the resource assigned to the task. Although you can add hyperlinks to tasks, resources, or assignments, hyperlinks can point only to tasks or resources in your Project file. Moreover, you must know the task ID or resource ID that you want to link to before you open the Insert Hyperlink dialog box.

To create a hyperlink to another location in the same Project file, do the following:

  1. Right-click the task, resource, or assignment to which you want to add a hyperlink, and then choose Hyperlink.

    The Insert Hyperlink dialog box opens.

  2. In the “Text to display” box, type a brief description of the hyperlink destination.

    Project keeps your description when you select a destination task or resource. If you don’t fill in the “Text to display” box, then Project fills it in with the view name and ID that you select, which isn’t particularly informative—for instance, “Gantt Chart!20 for task ID 20 in the Gantt Chart view.”

  3. In the “Link to” section, select “Place in This Document”.

    Project replaces the “Look in” area with a box for task or resource ID and a list of views to select, as shown in Figure 2.

    When “Existing File or Web Page” is selected in the “Link to” area, you can still create a hyperlink within the file. Click Bookmark to open the “Select Place in Document” dialog box, which contains an ID box and view list.

    Figure 2. When “Existing File or Web Page” is selected in the “Link to” area, you can still create a hyperlink within the file. Click Bookmark to open the “Select Place in Document” dialog box, which contains an ID box and view list.

  4. In the “Enter the task or resource ID” box, type the number for the task or ID (the number in the first column of the task or resource table).

    Project determines whether the number is a task ID or resource ID based on the view you select. ID represents a task ID when you select a task-oriented view like the Gantt Chart; selecting the Resource Sheet changes the box to a resource ID.

  5. In the “Select a view in this project” box, select the view you want Project to display when you follow the hyperlink.

    If you haven’t filled in the “Text to display” box, then Project inserts the view name in the box in front of the ID.

  6. Click OK.

    A hyperlink indicator appears in the Indicators column. Clicking the hyperlink indicator switches to the hyperlinked view and opens the Task Information dialog box (or Resource Information dialog box) for the hyperlinked task or resource.

    If you right-click the task, resource, or assignment and then choose Hyperlink→Open, Project opens the hyperlinked view, and then selects the first cell in the row for the hyperlinked task or resource.

Up To Speed: Reviewing Hyperlinks

Checking that hyperlinks are correct is a good idea after time has passed, as files may find homes in new locations. The ScreenTip pop-up box for hyperlink indicators shows the hyperlink description, which typically isn’t the file or location you’re jumping to. If you right-click an element and then choose Hyperlink→Open, you don’t know where the hyperlink goes until Project follows it.

To simplify hyperlink review, display the Hyperlink table, which displays the Task Name, Hyperlink, Address, and SubAddress columns. (Resource views begin with the Resource Name column.) To apply the Hyperlink table, right-click the Select All cell (the cell above the ID column), and then, in the shortcut menu, choose More Tables. In the More Tables dialog box, choose Hyperlink, and then click Apply. This table shows hyperlinks for the tasks or resources; you don’t see any values other than task names or resource names if the tasks or resources don’t have hyperlinks.

In the Hyperlink table, the Hyperlink column shows the hyperlink description. Address represents the Hyperlink Address field and shows the external files or web pages you hyperlink to. For hyperlinks between locations in the file, the Address cell is empty. Instead, the SubAddress column represents the Hyperlink Subaddress field, which shows the view and ID for internal hyperlinks. All the entries in these cells are “hot,” so you can click them to follow the hyperlink.

 
Others
 
- Microsoft Project 2010 : Project on the Internet (part 1) - Hyperlinking to Information - Creating a Hyperlink to a File or Web Page
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating an Index (part 2) - Adding an Index to a Document - Generating an Index
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating an Index (part 1) - Adding an Index to a Document - Marking an Index Entry
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating a Table of Contents (part 2) - Adding a TOC to a Document - Inserting a Customized Table of Contents
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating a Table of Contents (part 1) - Adding a TOC to a Document - Inserting an Automatic Table of Contents
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating an Outline (part 3) - Building an Outline - Expanding and Collapsing Parts of an Outline , Reorganizing an Outline
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating an Outline (part 2) - Building an Outline - Adding Headings to an Outline, Promoting and Demoting Headings
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Creating an Outline (part 1) - Working in Outline View
- Microsoft Excel 2010 : Working with Graphics - Inserting a Diagram,Inserting an Object
- Microsoft Excel 2010 : Working with Graphics - Inserting WordArt, Using Smart Art in Excel
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.