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Microsoft Project 2010 : Project on the Internet (part 3) - Integrating Project and Outlook - Importing Tasks from Outlook, Copying Tasks from an Email

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10/16/2014 9:38:47 PM

Integrating Project and Outlook

Outlook is Microsoft’s email workhorse, but email is only one of the ways that Outlook and Project work as a team. When you’re in Project, you can email Project files without jumping over to Outlook to do so. But because both programs can store lists of tasks and names, you can export Project tasks to Outlook and vice versa. You can even use your Outlook address book to build your resource list in Project. This section explains how to use these features.

Adding Project Tasks to Outlook

If the old saying “out of sight, out of mind” is all too true in your case, you can keep important Project tasks in sight by adding them (one at a time) to your Outlook Task List. By adding a reminder to these Outlook tasks, you can really stay on top of things. All you need is copy and paste. Here are the steps:

  1. In a task-oriented view like the Gantt Chart, select the Task Name cell for the task you want to copy to Outlook and press Ctrl+C. (Or right-click the cell and choose Copy Cell.)

    You can select only one task at a time. Project copies the task name to the Clipboard.

  2. In Outlook, display the Tasks list.

    In the navigation bar, click Tasks.

  3. Right-click the Tasks list and choose New. (Or choose Home→New Task.)

    The Task entry window appears with the heading Untitled–Task.

  4. Click the Subject box, and then press Ctrl+V.

    In the Subject box, the name of the task appears. If you want Outlook to remind you about the task due date, turn on the Reminder checkbox and then choose the date and time when you want to be reminded.

  5. On the ribbon, click Save & Close.

    Repeat steps 1 through 4 for other tasks you want to add to Outlook.

Importing Tasks from Outlook

Every once in a while, you quickly create tasks in Outlook that you later realize belong in one of your projects. You can import these tasks into a Project file as a head start. When you import tasks from Outlook, you just create tasks with the task names from Outlook and any notes that you added. Although these imported tasks come in with the standard duration of 1 day? (the question mark indicates estimated duration), they have no task dependencies, resources, or dates. To import Outlook tasks, follow these steps:

  1. Open the Project file, display a task-oriented view like the Gantt Chart, and then choose Task→Insert→Task→Import Outlook Tasks.

    The Import Outlook Tasks dialog box opens. Outlook doesn’t have to be running, but you must have at least one incomplete task in your Outlook Task list. If you have no tasks in Outlook or they’re all complete, a message appears telling you there are no tasks to import.

  2. Select the checkbox for each task you want to import, as shown in Figure 3.

    Any notes you typed in the Notes box in Outlook appear in the Notes cell in the table.

    To quickly select all the tasks, click Select All. Click Clear All to turn off all the check-boxes and start over. Don’t turn on the checkboxes for folders and categories.

    Figure 3. To quickly select all the tasks, click Select All. Click Clear All to turn off all the check-boxes and start over. Don’t turn on the checkboxes for folders and categories.

  3. Click OK.

    The tasks appear at the end of the list of tasks in your Project file.

Copying Tasks from an Email

When it comes to copying and pasting, Project 2010 has gotten a lot chummier with its Office 2010 counterparts. If you copy an indented list of tasks from an Outlook email or a Word document, Project 2010 is smart enough to turn them into summary tasks and subtasks in your Project Task list. Figure 4 shows the tasks in Outlook and the same tasks after pasting them into Project.

In an Outlook email, select the tasks you want to copy to Project and press Ctrl+C. Switch to Project and select the first blank Task Name cell where you want to copy the tasks. Press Ctrl+V. When you paste the tasks into Project, it uses indents in the email to set the outline levels for the tasks.

Figure 4. In an Outlook email, select the tasks you want to copy to Project and press Ctrl+C. Switch to Project and select the first blank Task Name cell where you want to copy the tasks. Press Ctrl+V. When you paste the tasks into Project, it uses indents in the email to set the outline levels for the tasks.

 
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- Microsoft Project 2010 : Project on the Internet (part 2) - Hyperlinking to Information - Creating a Hyperlink to a Location in the Project File
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