IT tutorials
 
Windows
 

Windows Server 2012 : A complete virtualization platform (part 1) - Hyper-V extensible switch - Configuring virtual switches

- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019
- How to active Windows 8 without product key
- Malwarebytes Premium 3.7.1 Serial Keys (LifeTime) 2019
1/23/2014 2:38:35 AM

Virtualization can bring many benefits for businesses, including increased agility, greater flexibility, and improved cost efficiency. Combining virtualization with the infrastructure and tools needed to provision cloud applications and services brings even greater benefits for organizations that need to adapt and scale their infrastructure to meet the changing demands of today’s business environment. With its numerous improvements, Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012 provide the foundation for building private clouds that can use the benefits of cloud computing across the business units and geographical locations that typically make up today’s enterprises. By using Windows Server 2012, you can begin transitioning your organization’s datacenter environment toward an infrastructure as a service (IaaS) private cloud that can provide your business units with the “server instances on demand” capability that they need to be able to grow and respond to changing market conditions.

Hosting providers also can use Windows Server 2012 to build multi-tenant cloud infrastructures (both public and shared private clouds) that they can use to deliver cloud-based applications and services to customers. Features and tools included in Windows Server 2012 enable hosting providers to fully isolate customer networks from one another, deliver support for service level agreements (SLAs), and enable chargebacks for implementing usage-based customer billing.

Let’s dig into these features and capabilities in more detail. We’ll also get some insider perspective from experts working at Microsoft who have developed, tested, deployed, and supported Windows Server 2012 during the early stages of the product release cycle.

Scenario-focused design in Windows Server 2012

One of the best things about Windows Server 2012 is that it was designed from the ground up, with a great focus on actual customer scenarios. Windows Server is the result of a large engineering effort, and in past releases, each organization delivered its own technology innovations and roadmap in its respectively relevant area. The networking team would build great networking features; the storage team would innovate on file and storage systems; the manageability team would introduce PowerShell to enable a standard way to manage servers, and so on.

Windows Server 2012 is different. Instead of having vertical technology-focused roadmaps and designs, it was built around specific customer scenarios for the server. I was the scenario leader for the “hosted cloud” scenario, which was all about building the most cloud-optimized operating system ever built and aligning multiple feature crews on enabling enterprises and hosting providers to build clouds that are better than ever.

Scenario-focused design starts by understanding the business need and the real customer pain points and requirements. During the planning phase, we talked to a very long list of customers and did not limit ourselves to any specific technology. Instead, we have framed the discussion around the need to build and run clouds and discovered pain points, such as the need to offer secure multi-tenancy and isolation to your cloud tenants, so that hosting providers can be more efficient in utilizing their infrastructure and lowering their cost. There’s also a need to be able to automate manual processes end to end because manual processes just don’t cut it anymore, and the need to lower the cost of storage because customers were clearly overpaying for very expensive storage even when they don’t really need it. We then translated that understanding into investments that cross technology boundaries that will solve those business problems and satisfy the customer requirements.

For example, to enable multi-tenancy, we didn’t just add some access control lists (ACLs) on the Hyper-V switch. Instead, we’ve built a much better Hyper-V switch with isolation policy support and added network virtualization to decouple the physical cloud infrastructure from the VM networks. Then we added quality of service (QoS) policies to help hosting providers ensure proper SLAs for different tenants and resource meters to enable them to measure and charge for activities, and we also ensured that everything will be fully automatable (via PowerShell, of course), in a consistent way.

Here’s another example: we didn’t just add support for a new network interface card (NIC) technology called Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA). Instead, we’ve designed it to work well with file servers and provide SMB Direct support to enable the use of file servers in a cloud infrastructure over standard Ethernet fabric, and used storage spaces for low-cost disks. This way, competitive performance compared to SANs is made available at a fraction of the cost.

Finally, scenario-focused design doesn’t actually end at the design phase. It’s a way of thinking that starts at planning but continues all the way through execution, internal validation, external validation with our TAP program, partner relations, documentation, blogging, and, of course, bringing the product to market. Basically, at every stage of the Windows Server 2012 execution cycle, the focus was on making the scenario work, rather than on making specific features work.

This kind of a scenario-focused requires an amazingly huge collaborative effort across technology teams. This is exactly where Windows Server 2012 shines and is the reason you’re seeing all of these great innovations coming together in one massive release that will change the way clouds are built.

1. Hyper-V extensible switch

The new Hyper-V extensible switch in Windows Server 2012 is key to enabling the creation of secure cloud environments that support the isolation of multiple tenants. The Hyper-V extensible switch in Windows Server 2012 introduces a number of new and enhanced capabilities for tenant isolation, traffic shaping, protection against malicious virtual machines, and hassle-free troubleshooting. The extensible switch allows third parties to develop plug-in extensions to emulate the full capabilities of hardware-based switches and support more complex virtual environments and solutions.

Previous versions of Hyper-V allowed you to implement complex virtual network environments by creating virtual network switches that worked like physical layer-2 Ethernet switches. You could create external virtual networks to provide VMs with connectivity with externally located servers and clients, internal networks to allow VMs on the same host to communicate with each other as well as the host, or private virtual networks (PVLANs) that you can use to completely isolate all VMs on the same host from each other and allow them to communicate only via external networks.

The Hyper-V extensible switch facilitates the creation of virtual networks that can be implemented in various ways to provide great flexibility in how you can design your virtualized infrastructure. For example, you can configure a guest operating system within a VM to have a single virtual network adapter associated with a specific extensible switch or multiple virtual network adapters (each associated with a different switch), but you can’t connect the same switch to multiple network adapters.

What’s new however is that the Hyper-V virtual switch is now extensible in a couple of different ways. First, you can now install custom Network Driver Interface Specification (NDIS) filter drivers (called extensions) into the driver stack of the virtual switch. For example, you could create an extension that captures, filters, or forwards packets to extensible switch ports. Specifically, the extensible switch allows for using the following kinds of extensions:

  • Capturing extensions, which can capture packets to monitor network traffic but cannot modify or drop packets

  • Filtering extensions, which are like capturing extensions but also can inspect and drop packets

  • Forwarding extensions, which allow you to modify packet routing and enable integration with your physical network infrastructure

Second, you can use the capabilities of the Windows Filtering Platform (WFP) by using the built-in Wfplwfs.sys filtering extension to intercept packets as they travel along the data path of the extensible switch. You might use this approach, for example, to perform packet inspection within your virtualized environment.

These different extensibility capabilities of the Hyper-V extensible switch are intended primarily for Microsoft partners and independent software vendors (ISVs) so they can update their existing network monitoring, management, and security software products so they can work not just with physical hosts, but also with VMs deployed within any kind of virtual networking environment that you might possibly create using Hyper-V in Windows Server 2012. In addition, being able to extend the functionality of the Hyper-V networking by adding extensions makes it easier to add new networking functionality to Hyper-V without needing to replace or upgrade the switch. You’ll also be able to use the same tools for managing these extensions that you use for managing other aspects of Hyper-V networking, namely the Hyper-V Manager console, PowerShell, and Windows Management Instrumentation (WMI). And because these extensions integrate into the existing framework of Hyper-V networking, they automatically work with other capabilities, like Live Migration.

Table 1 summarizes some of the benefits of the Hyper-V extensible switch from both the IT professional and ISV perspective.

Table 1. Benefits of the Hyper-V extensible switch

Key Tenets

Benefit to ISVS

Benefit to IT Professionals

Open platform w/public API

Write only the functionalities desired

Minimal footprint for errors

First-class citizen of system

Free system services (e.g., Live Migration)

Extensions from various ISVs work together

Existing API model

Faster development

Larger pool of extension implementers

Logo certification and rich framework

Higher customer satisfaction

Higher extension quality

Unified Tracing thru virtual switch

Lower support costs

Shorter downtimes

1.1 Configuring virtual switches

Figure 1 shows the Windows Filtering Platform (WPF) extension selected in the Virtual Switch Manager of the Hyper-V Console in the beta version of Windows Server 2012. Note that once extensions are installed on the host, they can be enabled or disabled and also have their order rearranged by moving them up or down in the list of switch extensions.

Virtual switch extensions for the Hyper-V extensible switch.

Figure 1. Virtual switch extensions for the Hyper-V extensible switch.

You can also use PowerShell to create, delete, and configure extensible switches on Hyper-V hosts. For example, Figure 2 shows how to use the Get-VMSwitchExtension cmdlet to display details concerning the extensions installed on a specific switch.

Displaying all extensions installed on the virtual switch named CONTOSO.

Figure 2. Displaying all extensions installed on the virtual switch named CONTOSO.

You also can display the full list of PowerShell cmdlets for managing the extensible switch, as Figure 3 illustrates.

Displaying all PowerShell cmdlets for managing virtual switches.

Figure 3. Displaying all PowerShell cmdlets for managing virtual switches.

 
Others
 
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Windows PowerShell (part 4) - Verifying domain-controller deployment
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Windows PowerShell (part 3) - Additional domain controller in domain
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Windows PowerShell (part 2) - Using Windows PowerShell to deploy domain controllers - First domain controller in new forest
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Windows PowerShell (part 1)
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Server Manager (part 6) - Uninstalling AD DS
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Server Manager (part 5) - Verifying the installation
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Server Manager (part 4) - First Windows Server 2012 domain controller in an existing forest
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Server Manager (part 3) - Additional domain controller in new domain
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Server Manager (part 2) - First domain controller in new forest
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying domain controllers using Server Manager (part 1) - Preparing for domain-controller deployment, Installing the AD DS role
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS