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BlackBerry Java Application Development : Importing the HelloWorldDemo sample application

1/26/2013 4:56:21 PM
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Importing the HelloWorldDemo sample application

  1. To import an existing BlackBerry JDE workspace, the first step is to select File | Import....

  2. This displays the "Import" dialog that displays a collapsed tree with the many different kinds of projects that can be imported, as shown in the next screenshot. Notice the node labeled BlackBerry in that tree. Click on the small plus (+) sign next to that node and select Existing BlackBerry Projects into Workspace and then click on the Next button.

  3. The next step is to select the projects to be imported. The dialog is empty initially, but is populated by clicking on the Browse button and navigating to the proper directory. If you accepted the defaults when installing Eclipse, the path should be C:\Program Files\Eclipse\plugins\net.rim.eide.componentpack4.5.0_4.5.0.16\components\samples. Navigate there, click on the Browse button, navigate to the samples directory, and select Samples.jdw. Then, click on the Open button.

    If an Eclipse project happens to be opened already, a dialog will be shown warning you that the current project will be overwritten.


  4. As soon as you select Open in the browse window the import tool will load the workspace file and all of the projects in that workspace will be shown in the list. By default, all of the projects are selected, but the projects' list allows you to selectively choose which projects to import. The fastest way to select just one project is to click on the Deselect All button, scroll to HelloWorldDemo, and check the checkbox next to it. Now that you're done with this step, click on the Finish button.

  5. Whether by design or not, imported projects are not activated automatically. To activate the project, open the Package Explorer (if it is not already open) and right-click the HelloWorldDemo project. Then, click on the Activate for BlackBerry menu item.

What just happened?

Well, that was exciting wasn't it? At this point you've started up Eclipse and loaded up the HelloWorldDemo sample application into Eclipse. To do this you had to import the sample from the JDE-formatted workspace file. Most of the time you won't be importing a project, but working with one of the supplied samples is a good way to get started!

Projects that have been imported are not activated by default. I'm not sure if this is by design or a bug, but the bottom line is that if you want to run an application after importing it you must activate it. If it is not done, the project will not be loaded into the simulator and you will be wondering why your application isn't showing up in the simulator.

If you create a new BlackBerry project instead of importing one, this step is already done for you! However, because we imported the project, we need to activate it before we can use it.
 
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