IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft Access 2010 : Linking to Another Type of Database (part 2) - Linking to SQL Server Databases

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
1/27/2015 3:18:52 AM

Linking to SQL Server Databases

In a system where you store your data solely in Access tables, the Access Database Engine supplies all data retrieval and management functions and handles security, data validation, and enforcement of referential integrity.

In a system where Access acts as a front end to client/server data, the server handles the data management functions. It’s responsible for retrieving, protecting, and updating data on the back-end database server. In this scenario, the local copy of Access is responsible only for sending requests and getting either data or pointers to data back from the database server. If you’re creating an application in which Access acts as a front end, capitalizing on the strengths of both Access and the server can be a challenging endeavor.

You might ask why you would want to convert your database to a client/server application. The reasons include the following:

  • Greater control over data integrity

  • Increased control over data security

  • Increased fault tolerance

  • Reduced network traffic

  • Improved performance

  • Centralized control and management of data

Scenarios in which you may need to upsize include the following:

  • Large number of simultaneous users (more than 10–15)

  • Large volume of data (tables with more than approximately 100,000 rows)

  • Increased need for security (payroll data and such)

Link to SQL Server Data

If you store your data in SQL Server, you will need to link to it from your Access database. The steps that follow show you how to link from an Access database to a table stored on a SQL Server:

1.
Select ODBC Database from the Import & Link group on the External Data tab of the Ribbon. The Get External Data – ODBC Database dialog appears.

2.
Select Link to the data source by creating a linked table and click OK. The Select Data Source dialog appears.

3.
Select the Machine Data Source tab. The dialog appears as in Figure 2.

Figure 2. The Machine Data Source tab of the Select Data Source dialog.


4.
Click New. A warning may appear indicating that you are unable to create System DSNs. If the warning appears, click OK to dismiss the dialog. The Create New Data Source Wizard appears (see Figure 3).

Figure 3. The first step of the Create New Data Source Wizard.


5.
Click Next. The wizard appears as in Figure 4.



Figure 4. The second step of the Create New Data Source Wizard.


6.
Select SQL Server or SQL Server Native Client 10.0 (depending on which version of SQL Server you are accessing), and then click Next.

7.
Click Finish to launch the Create a New Data Source to SQL Server Wizard (see Figure 5).

Figure 5. The first step of the Create a New Data Source to SQL Server Wizard prompts you to name the data source and to designate the source server.

8.
Supply a name and optional description for the data source.

9.
Designate the name of the SQL Server you want to connect to. (You might need to contact your system administrator to obtain this information.)

10.
Click Next. The wizard appears as in Figure 6.

Figure 6. Indicate the type of security you will use to log on to the server.

11.
Indicate the type of security you will use to log on to the server. (Again, you might need to contact your system administrator for this information.)

12.
Click Next. The wizard appears as in Figure 7.

Figure 7. Designate the default database that you want to connect to.

13.
Change the default database to point at the SQL Server database that you want to link to.

14.
Click Next. The final step of the wizard appears. You can generally leave all these settings at their default values.

15.
Click Finish. A dialog appears showing you all of the settings you have selected (see Figure 8).

Figure 8. Click Test Data Source to ensure that the settings you have selected are correct.


16.
Click Test Data Source to test your connection to the SQL Server database. A dialog appears confirming that the test was successful.

17.
Click OK to close the dialog, and OK again to close the wizard. Your data source appears in the list of available data sources.

18.
Click OK to select the new data source and begin the process of linking to the tables within it. The Link Tables dialog appears (see Figure 9).

Figure 9. The Link Tables dialog enables you to designate the tables you want to link to.


19.
Select the tables you want to link to and click OK. The process completes and the tables appear in the Navigation Pane with globes (see Figure 10), indicating that they are using ODBC to connect to the SQL Server. You can now treat the tables like any other linked tables.

Figure 10. The tables you selected appear with globes in the Navigation Pane.

 
Others
 
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Linking to Another Type of Database (part 1) - Link to Excel Spreadsheets, Link to Other Databases
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Employing Tools for Quality - Using Find and Replace (part 3) - Using Replace
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Employing Tools for Quality - Using Find and Replace (part 2) - Finding Formatted Text , Finding Special Characters
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Employing Tools for Quality - Using Find and Replace (part 1) - Extending Search Options
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Employing Tools for Quality - Finding Elusive Words with the Thesaurus
- Microsoft Word 2010 : Employing Tools for Quality - Correcting Errors
- Microsoft Excel 2010 : Bias in the Estimate, Excel’s Variability Functions
- Microsoft Excel 2010 : Calculating the Standard Deviation and Variance (part 2) - Population Parameters and Sample Statistics
- Microsoft Excel 2010 : Calculating the Standard Deviation and Variance (part 1)
- Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 : Establishing Printer Settings and Printing (part 2) - Choose the Format to Print, Specify the Number of Copies to Print
 
25 Inspiring Game of Thrones Quotes
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS