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Microsoft Project 2010 : Project on the Internet (part 5) - Integrating Project and Outlook - Routing a Project file to several recipients

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10/16/2014 9:40:40 PM

Routing a Project file to several recipients

When several people are in line to contribute to, review, or approve a Project file, routing an email with the file attached to each recipient is easier than trying to remember whom to email next. You can route the drawing to one recipient after another or blast the email to all recipients at once. When the recipients are done, the file comes back to you.

Routing a Project file to several people is similar to sending one to just one recipient. However, the Routing Recipient command is not on the ribbon out of the box, so you have to add it to a custom group that you create . Then, with the command in a group on the ribbon, do the following:

  1. Open the Project file you want to route, and then choose the ribbon tab to which you added the custom group and choose Routing Recipient.

    The Routing Slip dialog box appears.

  2. Click Address.

    Your email program’s address book opens.

  3. Select the email addresses for the recipients, click To, and then click OK.

    The email program adds the names to the To: box.

  4. Modify the Subject line to tell the recipients why you’re sending the file. In the “Message text” box, type a message.

    Remember to begin your email message with what you want people to do. You can add less important information after the opening paragraph.

    Select either the “One after another” or “All at once” option, as shown in Figure 6.

    The Routing Slip automatically selects “One after another”. Routing a file sequentially takes a lot of time, but each person sees the comments from the person before. Then, each recipient can add his two cents to the routing message. Although the email message shows up in recipients’ inboxes, routing the message to the next person on the list occurs in Project. Choose the Routing Recipient command again to pass on the message and its attached file.

    On the other hand, to see what people think without being influenced by others, select the “All at once” option. With this option, recipients email you individually when they’re done.

    The recipients appear in the order that you select them initially in your address book. If you’re routing the file to one person after another, select a name, and then click the up or down arrows to change the order of recipients.

    Figure6. The recipients appear in the order that you select them initially in your address book. If you’re routing the file to one person after another, select a name, and then click the up or down arrows to change the order of recipients.

  5. To receive the routing email after every recipient has seen it, turn on the “Return when done” checkbox.

    If you select the “One after another” option, then the “Track status” checkbox automatically turns on and tells your email program to notify you as the message makes its way through the list.

  6. Click Route.

    Project sends an email with the file attached to your routing recipients.

Publishing a Project file to an Exchange folder

If your organization uses Microsoft Exchange, you can publish a Project file to an Exchange folder instead of sending the same file to multiple recipients. You must first add the Send To Exchange Folder command to a custom group on the ribbon . With the Send To Exchange Folder command on the ribbon, publish a file to a Microsoft Exchange folder by following these steps:

  1. In Project, open the file you want to publish to an Exchange folder, choose the tab that contains the custom group, and then choose Exchange Folder.

    The “Send to Exchange Folder” dialog box appears and lists the available folders.

  2. Select the folder, and then click OK.

    Project saves the file in the Exchange folder. You can also create a new folder by clicking New Folder, typing a name, and then pressing Enter.

 
Others
 
- Microsoft Project 2010 : Project on the Internet (part 4) - Integrating Project and Outlook - Sending Project Information to Others
- Microsoft Project 2010 : Project on the Internet (part 3) - Integrating Project and Outlook - Importing Tasks from Outlook, Copying Tasks from an Email
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