IT tutorials
 
Mobile
 

BlackBerry Java Application Development : Starting the Eclipse IDE, Launching Eclipse for the first time

1/26/2013 4:54:34 PM
- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire

1. Starting the Eclipse IDE

Starting Eclipse isn't like starting most other Windows programs. Even though we used the full installer to install Eclipse, the installer didn't create any program groups or icons on the Windows Start menu, so you can't launch it from there like a typical application. Instead, you need to open a Windows Explorer and browse to the installed directory (the default in the setup program was C:\Program Files\Eclipse). Once there, double-click the Eclipse program and it will start up.

Your Explorer preferences may be set up slightly differently than in the following screenshot. The important thing to look for here is the file with the purple globe icon in it. The name may be Eclipse or Eclipse.exe, again depending on your preferences.


Now, even though you can do this each time, it is somewhat of a pain to do. There are a couple of different approaches that you can take to make this easier. You could make a program group on the Start menu and place a shortcut to Eclipse in that group; however, it is a more advanced option. A simpler option is to place a shortcut to Eclipse on the desktop so that next time launching the program is a lot easier.

Like a lot of programs available today, Eclipse has a number of steps that you have to follow the first time you start the application.

2. Launching Eclipse for the first time

  1. Double-click the Eclipse icon or shortcut.

  2. If you installed Eclipse to a location other than the default, or you installed Eclipse by simply downloading it directly, you may get a warning from Windows when running the application. If this happens, click on the Run button to continue.

  3. Place a check in the Use this as the default and do not ask again checkbox and then click on the OK button to accept the default workspace location.

  4. The next screen to be shown is a stylish, but not a very useful, welcome screen. The important part of the welcome screen is the workbench icon, shown as a curved arrow icon, located on the right side of the screen. The workbench is where you will do all the real work in developing an application. Click on the workbench icon now.

What just happened?

When Eclipse is started for the first time, the "Workspace Launcher" dialog is shown asking what location to use for saving workspace and project files. It suggests a location in your user directory, but you can change this to any directory you wish.

At the bottom of the dialog is a checkbox allowing you to skip the dialog next time Eclipse is launched and it is a good idea to check that checkbox. You can always open a different workspace later through a menu item.

After getting past the "Workspace Launcher" dialog, you are shown a stylish welcome page. From here you can peruse general help, links, and samples that are pre-installed with Eclipse. Each bubble on the welcome screen represents a different topic. These can be useful for general Java programming, but they are not specific to BlackBerry, so we won't be using any of them.

Next time you launch Eclipse, you won't start at this screen, but there are some things that could be useful later, especially if you will be doing Java application development for other platforms. If you want to come back to this screen once you navigate away from it, you can do so by using the 'home' icon in the upper-right portion of the screen.

Once you get past the welcome screen you will see the Eclipse workbench. The workbench should look familiar if you have used other IDEs before-it's filled with lots of toolbars, windows, and other tools that you will use when developing an application.

A note about workspaces

Eclipse uses the concept of a workspace as a way to collect several projects so that they can be worked on together. In a nutshell, a workspace is a container for projects. Many common IDEs also use workspaces or similar concepts. In Microsoft Visual Studio, a solution is a concept equivalent to an Eclipse workspace.

A project is the next level of container. A project contains source files and generates a single compiled output, usually an application. Generally, one workspace is used to hold all of the projects for an organization, even if the projects are not necessarily related.

In Eclipse the workspace is tied to a directory, but in the JDE a workspace is a specific file. Obviously, these two formats are not compatible. Fortunately, there is a tool to import a JDE workspace into an Eclipse workspace, which is what we will do shortly.


 
Others
 
- Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Sprites in Detail (part 4) - Sprite Transparency, Alpha Tinting
- Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Sprites in Detail (part 3) - Partial Image Rendering, Layer Depth
- Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Sprites in Detail (part 2) - Rotation, Tinting
- Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Sprites in Detail (part 1) - Scaling
- BlackBerry Tablet Applications : Exploring the APIs - Camera Roll
- BlackBerry Tablet Applications : Exploring the APIs - Camera UI
- iphone Programming : Handling Data - Parsing JSON (part 2) - The Twitter Trends Application
- iphone Programming : Handling Data - Parsing JSON (part 1) - The Twitter Search Service
- Android : Using Selection Widgets - . Fields
- Android : Using Selection Widgets - Grid Your Lions (or Something Like That...)
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS