IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Backing Up Your Important Notes (part 3) - Immediately Backing Up All Changed Files, Immediately Backing Up All Notebooks, Copying Your Notebooks to a USB Drive

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
3/15/2015 11:21:49 PM

Immediately Backing Up All Changed Files

If you created or changed an important quantity of important notes and you do not want to expect the next interval of autosaving, you can immediately create a support of all your changed files:

1.
Click the File tab and then click Options.

2.
On the left side of the OneNote Options dialog box that appears, click the Save & Backup category.

3.
On the right side of the dialog box, under the Backup heading, click the Back Up Changed Files Now button. After a moment, you should see a confirmation message that tells you that the backup was created successfully (see Figure 3).

Figure 3. OneNote displays this confirmation whenever it successfully completes a backup that you’ve manually initiated.


4.
At the bottom of the OneNote Options dialog box, click OK.

Immediately Backing Up All Notebooks

Similar to the previous procedure, you can create a manual, immediate backup of all of your notebooks whenever you want or need to. This is most useful if you’ve created or changed a significant amount of important notes across multiple notebooks and you don’t want to wait for the next automatic backup interval.

To create an immediate backup, do the following:

1.
Click the File tab and then click Options.

2.
On the left side of the OneNote Options dialog box that appears, click the Save & Backup category.

3.
On the right side of the dialog box, under the Backup heading, click the Back Up All Notebooks Now button. After a moment, you should see a confirmation message that tells you that the backup was created successfully (see Figure 3).

4.
At the bottom of the OneNote Options dialog box, click OK.

Copying Your Notebooks to a USB Drive

Finally, there’s a quick-and-dirty way to create a complete, manual backup of all of the notebooks stored on your computer’s hard drive. If you’re still experimenting with the automatic backup settings I discussed in the previous procedures, you might want to create a complete, manual backup set of all of your notebooks.

Typically, I don’t recommend this option as a valid backup method because it creates a separate version of all of your notes. If you create too many copies of all of your notes, you might confuse yourself about which set is most current. However, I’m including this here as a final backup tip because it’s really the simplest and fastest way to an instant notebooks’ insurance policy.

To back up all of your notebooks to a USB drive, do the following:

1.
Connect your USB drive to your computer. For the highest reliability, connect USB drives only to the ports on your computer, not to USB hubs or USB extension cords.

2.
In Windows Explorer, navigate to your Documents (or My Documents) folder.

3.
Right-click the folder labeled OneNote Notebooks and then click Copy on the shortcut menu.

4.
Navigate to the contents of your USB drive. Right-click over a blank area in the window (not over any existing folders there), and then click Paste on the shortcut menu. OneNote will copy the entire OneNote Notebooks folder from your hard drive to your USB drive.

If you might confuse yourself with having multiple OneNote Notebooks folders appearing on multiple drives, consider renaming the copied folders on your USB drive by appending the date of the backup to the folder name. Alternately, you could also create a Readme text file in the same location, in which you briefly describe the purpose of the manual backup (for example, “Backup of all notebooks before major revisions on September 1, 2011”).

If you opt for this method of creating quick, manual backups of all of your OneNote files, be sure never to move or rename the original OneNote Notebooks folder (nor its subfolders) in your Documents (or My Documents) folder.

 
Others
 
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Backing Up Your Important Notes (part 2) - Changing the Automatic Backup Time Interval, Changing the Number of Backups to Keep
- Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Backing Up Your Important Notes (part 1) - Selecting a Backup Location
- Microsoft Outlook 2010 : Working with Contacts - Viewing Contact Information (part 2) - Use the Activities Tab, Display a Map
- Microsoft Outlook 2010 : Working with Contacts - Viewing Contact Information (part 1) - Print Contact Information
- Microsoft Outlook 2010 : Working with Contacts - Viewing Your Contacts Folder - Use the Contacts Folder, Add a Contact in the Address Book
- Microsoft Outlook 2010 : Working with Contacts - Inserting Items into a Contact Record - Add an Outlook Item, Add a File
- Microsoft Outlook 2010 : Adding a New Contact (part 2) - Use the Contact Window
- Microsoft Outlook 2010 : Adding a New Contact (part 1) - Create a Contact from an E-Mail Message
- Microsoft Acecss 2010 : Power Control Techniques (part 5) - Controlling Object Spacing, Modifying Object Tab Order
- Microsoft Acecss 2010 : Power Control Techniques (part 4) - Aligning Objects to One Another, Sizing Your Controls
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS