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Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Inserting Documents and Files (part 3) - Inserting a Scanner Printout on a Page

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4/22/2014 2:44:44 AM

Inserting a Scanner Printout on a Page

Scanning paper-based documents into OneNote is also an effective way to preserve sole-surviving copies of important documents, such as purchase receipts, signed legal forms, or contracts. By scanning such documents into OneNote, you’ll have an easier way of finding them again when you need them most, plus you’ll never have to worry again about spilling a cup of coffee on them.

To insert a scanner printout on a page, follow these steps:

1.
In OneNote, open or create the page in your notebook where you want to insert the scanned picture. For archiving scanned documents, you might want to create a separate page for each scan and then change its date stamp to match that of the scanned document.

2.
On the page, click the location where OneNote should place the imported picture. A blinking cursor will confirm where the scanner printout will be placed.

3.
On the Insert tab, in the Files group, click Scanner Printout.

4.
In the Insert Picture from Scanner or Camera dialog box, make sure your scanner is selected as the active device.

5.
For the Resolution, choose Print Quality. This yields a higher-quality scan for printed documents.

6.
Click Insert.

Depending on the make and model of your own scanner, you might see a slightly different user interface after you click the Scanner Printout button in step 3, but the results should be the same. As long as your scanner is properly configured and you can successfully scan with it in other Windows programs, it should work perfectly fine in OneNote, too.

If you’re having trouble scanning, please refer to the documentation that came with your scanner and make sure that you download the latest drivers for it from the manufacturer’s website.

After you’ve scanned a document into OneNote, its image can be resized, scaled, moved, rotated, and ordered in layers—just like regular images.

You can also copy the text from a scanned document by right-clicking the scanned image and then clicking the Copy Text from Picture command. Just like with regular images, this lets you copy the original text of a file printout and paste it elsewhere into your notes as editable text.

If you want to save a document that you’ve scanned into OneNote to your hard drive, either for archiving purposes or to use it in other programs, you can do so by right-clicking the scanned document in OneNote and then clicking the Save As command on the shortcut menu. Note that this is not necessary if you want to keep your scans in OneNote. The scans that appear on your page are already saved as part of your notebook.


 
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