IT tutorials
 
Office
 

Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Working with Links (part 1) - Creating a Link from Typed Text,Creating a Link from Selected Text

- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire
4/22/2014 2:26:05 AM

If you’re using OneNote to take notes just for yourself, an important part of collecting information and doing research is to keep track of where important information came from, in case you later want or need to return to its source.

If you’re using OneNote to also share your notes, information, and research with other people, pointing them to more information (or to additional information that relates to it) becomes just as important. In this section, you’ll learn how to create and use links—sometimes also called hyperlinks—to achieve both goals.

You might have noticed that when you take screen clippings from a web page by using the Insert Screen Clipping command on the ribbon, OneNote automatically inserts into your notes a link back to the source page where the screen clipping was taken (see Figure 1).
Figure 1. When you paste or import something from another source, such as a website, OneNote automatically includes a hyperlink back to that source so you can go back to it at a later time. If you don’t want to keep the link, you can delete it.


Automatic source links make it easy for you to revisit the origins of an imported selection of text, a picture, or a screen clipping again in the future—for example, when you want to check whether the original information has been updated or supplemented since you captured it.

Such automatically created links are easy enough to deal with: You can keep and click them when you want or need to, you can ignore them, or you can delete them when they’re no longer needed.

Now it’s time to learn how you can create and modify your own links from the text and pictures that make up your notes.

Creating a Link from Typed Text

While typing notes on a page in your notebook, you can quickly and easily have OneNote create a hyperlink by including certain parts of a link URL (short for uniform resource locator, better known as a web address that you type into a web browser).

To create a link from typed text, follow these steps:

1.
Click anywhere on the page and begin typing the following sentence, followed by a space: For more information, visit

2.
After the space, type www.office.com. As soon as you typed the prefix for World Wide Web, OneNote converted the text to an underlined blue style, which is a universal indicator for clickable text (also called hypertext, which is where the official term hyperlink got its name).

3.
When you now move the mouse pointer over the blue underlined text of the web address, the pointer changes to a hand icon, indicating you’re hovering over a clickable link (see Figure 2). If you click the text, OneNote will launch your web browser and open the web page that the link points to.

Figure 2. You can visit the destination of any hyperlink in your notes by moving the mouse pointer over the text and clicking it when the pointer changes to a hand icon.


The link prefix “www” (for World Wide Web) is a now widely accepted short form for a full hyperlink URL, which OneNote also recognizes. For example, you could have typed out the long form of the web address (in this case, http://www.office.com) and OneNote would create the same clickable link to the Microsoft Office home page on the Internet.

OneNote recognizes other prefixes as well, such as the “mailto:” prefix for creating clickable links that open an e-mail form (for example, mailto: someone@microsoft.com) and the “ftp.” prefix for pointing to an FTP file exchange server (for example, ftp.microsoft.com).

For links that you want to create which OneNote does not automatically recognize, you can create links from typed text that you select. Proceed to the next procedure to learn how.


Creating a Link from Selected Text

To manually create links from text in your notes, you can use OneNote’s Link command. Follow these steps:

1.
In your notes, select the text from which you want to create a link. If the link will be from a single word, double-click the word to select it. To select multiple words (for example, “Microsoft Office”), click and drag a selection with the mouse over the words you want to format as a link.

2.
When the text you want is selected, click the Insert tab on the ribbon.

3.
In the Links group, click Link.

4.
In the Link dialog box, type the full website URL (for example, http://www.office.com) into the Address box and then click OK.

Unlike an automatic hyperlink, which exposes the web address right in the text, links manually created from actual notes text won’t reveal their destination unless you move the mouse pointer over the link to reveal its URL in a ToolTip that appears (see Figure 3).

Figure 3. To check where a link that is embedded in text will go when you click it, rest the mouse pointer over the text until a ToolTip with the web address appears.


In most cases, links embedded in actual notes text are more useful because such links have immediate context and make your notes more readable than if a bunch of geeky URLs appear littered throughout your notes. This might not be an issue for you personally, but it’s something to consider when you share your notes with other people.

 
Others
 
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Relating the Information in Your Database - Establishing Relationships in Access
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Relating the Information in Your Database - The Types of Relationships
- Microsoft Visio 2010 : Distributing Templates and Stencils (part 2) - Creating a Separate Stencil for Shape and Code Delivery
- Microsoft Visio 2010 : Distributing Templates and Stencils (part 1) - Creating a Template with a Document Stencil
- Microsoft Visio 2010 : Introducing Automation and VBA Code (part 3) - Calling VBA Code from a SmartShape
- Microsoft Visio 2010 : Introducing Automation and VBA Code (part 2) - Using the Macro Recorder to Generate Code
- Microsoft Visio 2010 : Introducing Automation and VBA Code (part 1) - Exploring the VBA Development
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Introduction to Relational Database Design (part 2) - Normalization and Normal Forms
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Introduction to Relational Database Design (part 1) - Rules of Relational Database Design
- Developing Custom Microsoft Visio 2010 Solutions : Creating SmartShapes with the ShapeSheet (part 6) - Adding Right-Click Actions to the SmartShape
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS
Celebrity Style, Fashion Trends, Beauty and Makeup Tips.