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Microsoft OneNote 2010 : Working with Links (part 2) - Creating a Link from a Picture,Modifying a Link in Your Notes, Removing a Link from Your Notes

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4/22/2014 2:27:07 AM

Creating a Link from a Picture

Quite similar to making text clickable, you can also format a picture, a scanned image, or a screen clipping to contain a link that points to a website.

To create a link from a picture, follow these steps:

1.
In your notes, click an inserted picture from which you want to create a link.

2.
On the ribbon, click the Insert tab.

3.
In the Links group, click Link.

4.
In the Link dialog box, type the full website URL (for example, http://www.onenote.com) into the Address box and then click OK.

Although linked text will tip you off about its clickability by changing to a blue and underlined type style, linked pictures do not show any obvious sign of containing a link.

However, when you move the mouse pointer over a picture that contains a link, a ToolTip appears, showing you the destination of the link (see Figure 4).

Figure 4. To check where a link that is embedded in a picture will go when you click it, rest the mouse pointer over the picture until a ToolTip with the web address appears.


Just below the web address in the ToolTip, you’ll also see the instruction to hold the Ctrl button if you want to click and follow the link from the picture. This intentional link activation isn’t meant to make life more difficult for you. It makes clicking a link from a picture a more deliberate action and it preserves the ability to easily select, format, and work with pictures that contain a link. Without this Ctrl key click confirmation, you could never again click to select a picture to format, move, or delete it without constantly opening its link in a web browser.

Modifying a Link in Your Notes

If you want to update the web address that a link in your notes points to, you can easily edit it.

To modify a link in your notes, follow these steps:

1.
On the page, right-click the text or the picture that contains the link you want to modify.

2.
On the shortcut menu that appears, click Edit Link.

3.
In the Link dialog box that opens, the URL of the link is already selected for you in the Address box. Type over this address with the new or corrected link and then click OK.

For manually created links from a word or phrase of text that describes the link, or for links from pictures, you needn’t do anything else to modify a link. However, if you used the previous steps to modify a text link that OneNote automatically created from a web address or URL that you typed, modifying the link in the dialog box will not change the clickable text you see in your notes.

For example, if the link you edited originally appeared in your notes as www.microsoft.com in a blue, underlined style, and you then change the Address field in the Link dialog box to www.adobe.com, the link will now point to the Adobe website but the displayed text will continue to appear as www.microsoft.com, as before. To avoid this, make sure that you also change the Text to display field in the Link dialog box right above the Address field whenever you’re changing the existing URL of a link.

As a general rule, you should always manually test every link that you create, especially if you eventually plan to electronically share any part of your notes with other people.


Removing a Link from Your Notes

If you want to delete a link from notes text or from a picture in your notes, follow these steps:

1.
Right-click the text or the picture that contains the link that you want to delete.

2.
On the shortcut menu that appears, click Remove Link.

If you accidentally remove a link that you wanted to keep, remember the Undo command on the Quick Access Toolbar (or press Ctrl+Z).


This covers the basics of creating and modifying links in OneNote 2010. Rest assured that OneNote has a few more tricks up its sleeve when it comes to intelligent linking. If you looked closely at the Link dialog box, some of that functionality was already foreshadowed. However, those advanced features fall more under the subject of notebook organization.

 
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