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Windows Phone 7 to Windows Phone 8 : App publication (part 7) - Selective targeting - Device memory
Windows Phone 7.x apps are limited to using 90 MB of memory; that is, the app is promised that it can use up to 90 MB, and that while it might sometimes get more, there is no guarantee of this.
Windows Phone 7 to Windows Phone 8 : App publication (part 6) - Selective targeting - Device capabilities
As with content and markets, you can choose to build one app for the lowest common denominator of device or multiple versions for different device configurations.
Windows Phone 7 to Windows Phone 8 : App publication (part 5) - Beta testing, Versions
Apart from fixing bugs, improving the UI, providing fresher data, and adding features, the other main reason for updating is to take advantage of new features in the latest version of the platform and SDK.
Windows Phone 7 to Windows Phone 8 : App publication (part 4) - Updates
You can update the Windows Phone Store catalog information for your app at any time. This includes the descriptions, artwork, keywords, pricing and regional availability, and so on.
Windows Phone 7 to Windows Phone 8 : App publication (part 3) - Dev Center reports
The Dev Center also provides reports on your app, including the number of downloads, payment history (for non-free applications), ratings and reviews, and crash dumps (if any).
Windows Phone 7 to Windows Phone 8 : App publication (part 2) - The publication process
During development, you typically deploy your app to developer-unlocked phones, but normal users will install your app on retail phones. There are actually two supported ways to install an app onto a retail phone (that is, a phone that has not been developer-unlocked): via the Windows Phone Store, and via a company hub app.
Windows Phone 7 to Windows Phone 8 : App publication (part 1) - Preparing for publication
Before submitting your app to the Windows Phone Store for certification and publication, you are strongly encouraged to prepare for publication by using the Store Test Kit.
Windows Phone 7 : Silverlight User Interface Development - Designing for Windows Phone 7 (part 2) - Designer and Developer Mechanics
Silverlight for Windows Phone 7 is based on Silverlight 3 with some Silverlight 4 features pulled forward, putting XAML-based development front and center in mobile application development.
Windows Phone 7 : Silverlight User Interface Development - Designing for Windows Phone 7 (part 1) - Design Approach, Design Resources
Windows Phone 7 design resources includes a zip of icons to use directly in your application or as a model for custom application icons you build. The application icons come in .png and XAML vector format.
Windows Phone 7 : Building 2D Games with the XNA Framework - AlienShooter Game Play (part 6) - Updated GameplayScreen Class, Collision Detection and Memory Management
When you click "new game" in the main menu, the GameplayScreen is the screen that loads and the GameplayScreen class is where all of the game action occurs. The following sections cover how the GameplayScreen class manages the game objects, collision detection, and scoring.
Windows Phone 7 : Building 2D Games with the XNA Framework - AlienShooter Game Play (part 5) - Missile Class, Game Status Board Class
The GameStatusBoard class keeps track of and displays the score and lives available during the game. This class also plays sound effects when an enemy ship is destroyed and when the hero ship takes a hit from an enemy ship.
Windows Phone 7 : Building 2D Games with the XNA Framework - AlienShooter Game Play (part 4) - Hero Ship Class
We create another class named UserGameObject that inherits from the GameObject class. This class represents the player, which is the Hero Ship in AlienShooter, which makes it unique to the other classes since it takes user input in the form of accelerometer and touch.
Windows Phone 7 : Building 2D Games with the XNA Framework - AlienShooter Game Play (part 3) - Enemy Class
You will want to play on a real device to get a full sense of the game, but as you can see in Figure 5, the aliens strike different drop lines and fall fairly randomly for such little code. The animation code helps to keep things lively as well.
Windows Phone 7 : Building 2D Games with the XNA Framework - AlienShooter Game Play (part 2) - Game Object Class
We create a class named GameObject to be our base class for game assets, which includes the hero ship, the missiles, and the alien ships. The GameObject class handles the animation, Update, and Drawing for each object. We copied over the assets and sprite sheet logic from the SpriteAnimation sample project.
Windows Phone 7 : Building 2D Games with the XNA Framework - AlienShooter Game Play (part 1) - Sprite Animation
In this section we cover spite animation, which is the technique that brings a 2D game to life. Sprite Animation is a matter of showing frames or individual sprites at set intervals to give the illusion of motion, no different than flipping a drawing book that has pictures of a stick man running.
Windows Phone 7 : Building 2D Games with the XNA Framework (part 2) - AlienShooter Game Structure
When you create a new XNA project, it always creates two projects, one project for your game and the other for your content. The Content project provides compile-time processing for game assets, including detecting missing assets, asset conversion, compression, and pre-processing. The key component to the Content project is the Content Pipeline.
Windows Phone 7 : Building 2D Games with the XNA Framework (part 1)
This section covers how to add the game management and screens to the AlienShooter sample project. The best way to start creating a "real" game is to base it on the Game State Management sample, which includes a main menu, an options screen, some gameplay, and a pause menu.
Windows Phone 7 : Designing the Game Framework (part 3) - The GameHost Class
The next framework class is the GameHost class. This class holds collections of various objects that we will want to use in our games, specifically Dictionary objects containing textures and fonts, and a List of the actual game objects.
Windows Phone 7 : Designing the Game Framework (part 2) - The TextObject Class
So we have a simple way of representing a sprite, but it would be very useful to have a corresponding mechanism for representing text. We achieve this by creating the TextObject class.
Windows Phone 7 : Designing the Game Framework (part 1) - The GameObjectBase Class, The SpriteObject Class
XNA's Game class already provides a flexible engine for initializing and driving the game. What it doesn't offer is any built-in mechanism for managing the game objects that we want to display and manipulate inside the game.
Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Other Graphics Options
In many instances users may prefer to have this available because it gives them a window into the phone: they can see their battery level, their signal reception level, and so on.
Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Displaying Text
Most games need to display text while they are running, providing everything from the player's score through to menus and game information pages. XNA provides a very easy-to-use mechanism for showing text on the screen, so let's see what it can do and how we use it.
Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Useful Sprite Effects
Besides drawing individual graphics on the screen, there are various other useful effects that we can perform by using sprites. Let's take a look at a few of these effects: background images, fading to black, and fading between images.
Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Sprites in Detail (part 4) - Sprite Transparency, Alpha Tinting
A color key provides the simplest mechanism for making areas of your sprite transparent, but it is less flexible than the alpha channel approach that we will discuss in a moment. A color key identifies a particular pixel color within your image that will be treated as transparent.
Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Sprites in Detail (part 3) - Partial Image Rendering, Layer Depth
Sprites can draw just a subsection of their images, too. One of the main uses for this is for animation: multiple animation frames can be placed into a single image, and then individual frames can be rendered to the screen in sequence to animate the sprite.
Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Sprites in Detail (part 2) - Rotation, Tinting
Throughout all the calls to Draw, we have passed through a Color parameter, and in each case it has been Color.White. We can pass different colors instead of white to tint the graphic that is being drawn. If we pass Color.Blue, the sprite will be shaded in blue, for example.
Windows Phone 7 : Getting Started with XNA - Sprites in Detail (part 1) - Scaling
XNA can scale the sprite as we draw it, changing its size to make it smaller or larger. It can scale either uniformly (the sprite scales equally along the x and y axes) or non-uniformly (the x and y axes scale differently, stretching or squashing the image).
Windows Phone 7 Advanced Programming Model : Microsoft Push Notification Services
In this section we cover how Microsoft push notifications work, when to use notifications, and how to add push notifications to your application. First we start with an overview of how Microsoft push Notifications work.
Windows Phone 7 Advanced Programming Model : Building a music+videos Hub Application
Applications that play music or video can integrate more deeply into the Windows Phone 7 user experience. This helps to provide consistent quick access to content for the end user, while also allowing your application to surface content and the application itself within the music+videos hub in addition to the App List.
Windows Phone 7 Advanced Programming Model : Working with Video and Audio Media
Windows Phone 7 third-party applications cannot add media to the Media Library but third-party applications can add content to Isolated Storage in addition to playing video and audio content in memory.
 
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