IT tutorials
 
Technology
 

Windows Server 2012 : Deploying and configuring virtual machines (part 2) - Creating virtual machines

4/18/2014 1:09:03 AM
- Windows 10 Product Activation Keys Free 2019
- How to active Windows 8 without product key
- Malwarebytes Premium 3.7.1 Serial Keys (LifeTime) 2019

2. Creating virtual machines

You can create new virtual machines on a Hyper-V host by using either Hyper-V Manager or Windows PowerShell.

Using Hyper-V Manager

Creating a new virtual machine using Hyper-V Manager is performed in the same way as in previous versions of Windows Server. The steps in this process are as follows:

  1. Launch the New Virtual Machine Wizard by right-clicking on the host in Hyper-V Manager and selecting New and then Virtual Machine.

  2. Specify a descriptive name for the new virtual machine, and optionally specify a different location for storing the virtual machine’s files (configuration files, virtual hard disks, and snapshots) if the default storage locations for the host are not the ones you want to use.

  3. Specify the amount of startup memory to be used by the virtual machine’s guest operating system, and specify whether Dynamic Memory is to be used for the virtual machine.

  4. Select an existing virtual switch on the host that should be connected to the virtual network adapter on the virtual machine, or leave the virtual machine unconnected from any virtual switches on the host.

  5. Create a new virtual disk as the system volume on the virtual machine, attach an existing virtual disk for this purpose, or create the virtual machine without any virtual hard disks attached so that you can attach one later. If you choose the first option, you can specify whether to install the guest operating system later, install it from the virtual CD/DVD drive or ISO image file or virtual floppy disk, or install it from a network-based installation server (if you have connected the virtual network adapter to a virtual switch).

Using Windows PowerShell

You can also use the New-VM cmdlet to create a new virtual machine using Windows PowerShell. For example, to create a new virtual machine named SRV-A on HOST4, assign the virtual machine 1 GB of startup memory, attach it to the virtual switch named CONTOSO Virtual Switch, create a new virtual hard disk (VHDX file) of size 500 GBs in the default location, and make the virtual CD drive the default boot device, use the following command:

PS C:\> New-VM -ComputerName HOST4 -Name SRV-A -MemoryStartupBytes 1GB `
-BootDevice CD -SwitchName "CONTOSO Virtual Switch" -NewVHDSizeBytes 500GB `
-NewVHDPath SRV-A.vhdx

Name State CPUUsage(%) MemoryAssigned(M) Uptime Status
---- ----- ----------- ----------------- ------ ------
SRV-A Off 0 0 00:00:00 Operating normally

Importing virtual machines

Importing existing virtual machines onto a Hyper-V host can also be performed using either Hyper-V Manager or Windows PowerShell. For example, to import a virtual machine using Hyper-V Manager, select the target host and click Import Virtual Machine in the Actions pane. This launches the Virtual Machine Import Wizard. As Figure 1 shows, you can use this wizard to perform the various import scenarios described earlier in this lesson.

Using the Import Virtual Machine Wizard.
Figure 1. Using the Import Virtual Machine Wizard.

To import virtual machines using Windows PowerShell, use the Import-VM cmdlet.

 
Others
 
- Windows Server 2012 : Deploying and configuring virtual machines (part 1) - Planning virtual machine deployment
- Sharepoint 2013 : Manage Tags and Notes
- Sharepoint 2013 : Follow Colleagues to See What They Are Posting
- Sharepoint 2013 : Use Microblogging to Let Others Know What You Are Doing or Thinking
- Sharepoint 2013 : Get Started with Social Features
- Windows 8 : Working with backup and restoration (part 4) - Two new methods of restoration and recovery
- Windows 8 : Working with backup and restoration (part 3) - Restoring an entire computer, Using System Restore for less invasive troubleshooting
- Windows 8 : Working with backup and restoration (part 2) - Protecting files and data by using File History
- Windows 8 : Working with backup and restoration (part 1) - Backing up Windows 8, Creating additional images
- Deploying Microsoft Lync Server 2013 Mobility (part 4) - Controlling Functionality with Mobility Policies
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS