IT tutorials
 
Graphics
 

Corel Painter X : Graphic Techniques - It is Only a Mask (part 2) - Airless Airbrush

10/27/2011 4:56:06 PM
- How To Install Windows Server 2012 On VirtualBox
- How To Bypass Torrent Connection Blocking By Your ISP
- How To Install Actual Facebook App On Kindle Fire

Airless Airbrush

The ideal brush category for working with selection masks is Airbrushes. Traditional airbrushes spray tiny droplets of pigment mixed with compressed air. The instrument connected to that compressed air source is a metal device with a nozzle and a small reservoir for pigment. It has a couple of tiny wheels for finger control of the size of the spray and the density and coarseness of the droplets. It takes quite a bit of practice to get skilled with a traditional airbrush. Painter lets you shave months, even years, off that process. Make a new canvas for trying out several of the Airbrush variants.

Figure 5 shows some airbrush practice. Check out the realistic response to the tilt and bearing of your Wacom pen as you change its angle and direction. The two purple strokes, made with the Pepper Spray variant, were done with the pen held at a steep angle to the tablet, in opposite directions. The green strokes show what happens when an airbrush is moved rapidly but lingers a bit at the beginning and the end of a stroke: pigment keeps on spraying. The blue star was made with the Fine Wheel Airbrush. I sprayed a bit at the lower left of the selection, then used Select > Invert so I could spray outside of the star. I switched to the Soft Airbrush 40 to make the very smooth pink strokes and the heart. Both the heart and the yellow propeller show a basic technique for creating the illusion of depth: spray a slightly darker color for the shadow side, slightly lighter for the highlights. Remember to be consistent with your imaginary light source.

Figure 5. Fresh air.


The imaginary landscape in Figure 6 was created with a combination of smooth and coarse Airbrush variants and a few selection masks made with the Lasso tool. A couple of the masks, “mountains” and “bushes,” were saved for repeated use. RIFF files showing the development of this piece are available in the Lesson 6 folder on the CD, and they include the saved selections. When you use the Save Selection command, a new channel is created. Open the Channels Palette, where you’ll find icons for saving, loading, and inverting them. Those options are also available in the Select menu.

Figure 6. Purple mountain majesty.


These are the Airbrush variants I used for different parts of the artwork.

  • Soft Airbrush 50 Mountains, dark green hills, foreground flowers, cloud.

  • Pepper Spray Light green grass, snow on mountain tops, sky.

  • Tiny Spattery Airbrush Yellow flowers on the green grass.

  • Coarse Spray Foreground pink and fuchsia bushes.

Recreate this whimsical landscape with me. Start with a white canvas 3 × 4 inches at 300 ppi. Open the RIFF file of the final stage. Feel free to borrow the selection masks I saved or make similar ones with the Lasso tool—they’re quick and easy. Figure 7 shows the Channels Palette for the completed piece, and Figure 8 has my “mountains” mask (the marching ants are resting temporarily).

Figure 7. Channels tuned in.


Figure 8. Ants march over mountains.


Move your Lasso selection into position with the Selection Adjuster tool. Spray a light purplish-blue color for the furthest mountain range, then switch to the Selection Adjuster to move the selection lower for the next group of mountains. Use a slightly darker color for this section. Save the selection in case you need it later. For a little variety, before spraying the third set of mountains, I flipped the selection horizontally. There doesn’t seem to be a way to do this automatically, so with the Selection Adjuster tool active I dragged one edge across to the opposite side, then pulled the second edge out the other way. Kids, don’t try this at home…and don’t confuse this transformation with the Invert command, which deselects all selected areas and vice versa.

I made a new Lasso selection for the green hills. Some lighter green highlights were added with a large-sized brush, stroking from above the selection for more control. Figure 9 shows this technique.

Figure 9. The hills are alive.


Figure 10 shows a lot of progress, with sky added and some snow sprinkled on the mountains, aided by loading the mountain selection once again. (I knew it would come in handy.) The foreground bushes were sprayed in using a new selection, saved as “bushes.”

Figure 10. Sky and bushes added.


Now let’s add a fluffy cloud, sprayed white and then given a gentle shadow and sunny glow at its top. As a finishing touch, the foreground could use a bit of detail. I scribbled a Lasso selection to suggest a flower shape, gave it the shadow-and-highlight treatment, and then inverted the selection so I could spray a darker pink behind it. A couple of these Lasso scribbles were worth repeating, so I dragged them to a new position with the Selection Adjuster and repeated the process. It was easy to make a few new flower scribbles, too. I like the irregular edges of this painting, giving the viewer a glimpse at the process. So it turns out that airbrush art doesn’t have to be slick, smooth, and realistic. And it doesn’t necessarily have to feature either sports cars or what used to be called “pinup” girls.

 
Others
 
- Corel Painter X : Graphic Techniques - It is Only a Mask (part 1) - Fancy Schmancy
- Adobe Flash Professional CS5 : Removing External Content
- Adobe Flash Professional CS5 : Loading External Content
- Adobe InDesign CS5 : Customizing - General Preferences Controls
- Adobe InDesign CS5 : Customizing - Modifying the Menu Commands
- CorelDRAW X5 : Working with Single-and Multi-Page Documents - Page Commands
- CorelDRAW X5 : Working with Single-and Multi-Page Documents - Naming Pages
- Saving Files from Illustrator CS5 (part 4) - The Flex Exchange Graphic Format & The Scalable Vector Graphics Format
- Saving Files from Illustrator CS5 (part 3) - The Portable Document Format
- Saving Files from Illustrator CS5 (part 2) - The Encapsulated PostScript Format
 
 
Top 10
 
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 2) - Wireframes,Legends
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Finding containers and lists in Visio (part 1) - Swimlanes
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Formatting and sizing lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Adding shapes to lists
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Adding Structure to Your Diagrams - Sizing containers
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 3) - The Other Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 2) - The Data Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Control Properties and Why to Use Them (part 1) - The Format Properties of a Control
- Microsoft Access 2010 : Form Properties and Why Should You Use Them - Working with the Properties Window
- Microsoft Visio 2013 : Using the Organization Chart Wizard with new data
programming4us programming4us
 
Popular tags
 
Video Tutorail Microsoft Access Microsoft Excel Microsoft OneNote Microsoft PowerPoint Microsoft Project Microsoft Visio Microsoft Word Active Directory Biztalk Exchange Server Microsoft LynC Server Microsoft Dynamic Sharepoint Sql Server Windows Server 2008 Windows Server 2012 Windows 7 Windows 8 Adobe Indesign Adobe Flash Professional Dreamweaver Adobe Illustrator Adobe After Effects Adobe Photoshop Adobe Fireworks Adobe Flash Catalyst Corel Painter X CorelDRAW X5 CorelDraw 10 QuarkXPress 8 windows Phone 7 windows Phone 8 BlackBerry Android Ipad Iphone iOS