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Microsoft Access 2010 : Create Custom Forms (part 1) - Modifying Forms Created by Using a Wizard

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2/28/2015 6:48:19 PM

Modifying Forms Created by Using a Wizard

When a form is envisaged like primary method to enter new records, it includes usually all the fields of the fundamental table. The fastest manner to create a form which includes all the fields of a table is to use the tool of form. Another method, which provides more control of the creation of the form, is to employ a magician. In one or the other of case, you can easily adapt the form after it is created.

We showed you how to work with forms in the sight of provision. Since you can see the data in the table or the tables fundamental in this sight, it is easy to measure the effects to move and classify controls and their labels. You can show the sheet of property and adjust properties to regulate with precision of the elements of form, and you can make most adjustments which you are likely to want under the custom form.

When you want more control over the layout of a form, you can work in Design view. In this view, you see the structure of the form laid out on a design grid, but you don’t see the data from the underlying table or tables.

Modifying Forms Created by Using a Wizard

In Design View, Access displays horizontal and vertical rulers and a grid to help you position controls and labels.

Tip

You cannot work with forms in a Web database in Design view; you must use Layout view.

The design grid is divided into three sections:

  • Form Header . This section contains information to be displayed at the top of the form, such as a title.

  • Detail . This section contains a text box control and an associated label control for each of the fields you selected for inclusion in the form.

  • Form Footer . This section can contain information to be displayed at the bottom of the form. By default, this section is blank, so it is closed.

In Design view, you can work with the form in the following ways:

  • Adjust the size of sections.

  • Apply a theme.

  • Change the size of controls.

  • Arrange controls logically to facilitate data entry.

  • Adjust the properties of form elements in the Property Sheet.

  • Add fields from the Field List, which you display by clicking the Add Existing Fields button in the Tools group on the Design contextual tab.

  • Add controls to limit data entry choices or add functionality to a form.

In this exercise, you’ll use the Form wizard to create a form that displays a list of product categories. You’ll then modify the form in Design view by formatting its title, making a control inaccessible to users, changing a label, and adding and resizing a control for a new field.

Set Up

  1. In the Navigation pane, click Customers. Then on the Create tab, in the Forms group, click the Form Wizard button.

    image with no caption

    The Form wizard starts.

    Set Up

    If a table is selected in the Navigation pane when you click the button, that table’s information populates the wizard’s first page.

  2. Display the Tables/Queries list, and click Table: Categories. In the Available Fields list, double-click CategoryID to move it to the Selected Fields list, and double-click CategoryName. Then click Next.

    On the wizard’s second page, you choose a layout for the new form. The preview area on the left shows how the form will look with the selected option applied.

  3. With Columnar selected, click Next.

    On the wizard’s last page, Access suggests the table’s name as the title of the form.

  4. With Open the form to view or enter information selected, click Finish.

    The new Categories form opens.

    Set Up

    The new form displays the first record in the Categories table.

  5. Scroll through a few records by using the controls on the record navigation bar at the bottom of the form.

    Let’s make a few changes in Design view.

  6. On the View Shortcuts toolbar, click the Design View button.

    image with no caption

    Access displays the design grid for the Categories form.

    Set Up

    The design grid for the Categories form.

  7. On the Design contextual tab, in the Themes group, click the Themes button. Then in the gallery that appears, click the Austin thumbnail.

    image with no caption

    You might notice only a subtle change in the font used for the control text. But behind the scenes, Access also makes the color scheme of the Austin theme available to the form.

  8. Click the Form Header section bar to select that section. Then on the Format contextual tab, in the Control Formatting group, click the Shape Fill button. Under Theme Colors in the palette that appears, click the third box (Light Green, Background 2).

    image with no caption
  9. Point to the bottom of the Form Header section (just above the Detail section bar), and when the pointer changes to a two-headed arrow, drag downward to enlarge the section until you can see the entire Categories title control.

  10. Click the Categories title control. On the Arrange contextual tab, in the Sizing & Ordering group, click the Size/Space button.

    image with no caption

    A list of sizing and spacing options appears.

    Set Up

    The Size/Space list.

  11. Under Size in the list, click To Fit.

  12. Point to the bottom of the Form Header section, and drag upward until the section is just tall enough to contain the title control.

  13. In the Detail section, click the CategoryID text box control, and on the Design contextual tab, in the Tools group, click the Property Sheet button.

    image with no caption

    Keyboard Shortcut

    Press F4 to open the Property Sheet.

  14. In the Property Sheet, click the Data tab. Click the Enabled property, click its arrow, and click No. Then close the Property Sheet.

    Disabling the CategoryID text box control changes its text and background to gray, indicating that users can no longer change this value.

  15. Click the Category Name label, double-click Category, and then delete it and the following space.

    Now let’s add the category description from the Categories table to this form.

  16. Point to the bottom of the Detail section, and drag downward until the section is about 2.5 inches tall. Then point to the right edge of the section and drag to the right until the section is about 5 inches wide.

  17. On the Design tab, in the Tools group, click the Add Existing Fields button.

    image with no caption

    Keyboard Shortcut

    Press Alt+F8 to open the Field List.

    The Field List opens.

    Keyboard Shortcut

    You can click Show All Tables to display the fields from other tables in the database.

  18. In the Field List, click Description, drag the field below the Category Name text box control in the Detail section, and then close the Field List.

  19. Point to the border of the Description text box control, and drag the control so that its left edge is aligned with the Category Name control above and its top edge sits at the 1 inch mark on the vertical ruler.

    Tip

    If you indicate the border of a control of zone of text and trail it on a new site, the associated label moves with him. In the same way, if you indicate the border of a control and an obstacle of label, control associated with zone of text moves as well. If you want to move one or the other of control independently of the other, you must trail the great gray place in the corner upper-left of control.

  20. Click the Description label control, and drag the large handle in the upper-left corner to the left until the control is aligned with the labels above. Then widen the control to match the other controls.

  21. Hold down the Shift key, and click the Name and CategoryID labels to add their controls to the selection. Then on the Format contextual tab, in the Font group, click the Align Text Right button.

    image with no caption
  22. Make the Detail section just tall enough to contain its controls.

    The form now occupies the smallest possible amount of space.

    Tip

    You have added a text box control and its associated label control.

  23. On the View Shortcuts toolbar, click the Form View button.

    image with no caption

    You can now see the results of your changes.

    Tip

    The labels and their controls now look neater on the form.

  24. Scroll through a few category records. Try to edit entries in the CategoryID field to confirm that you can’t.

    We don’t need the record selector bar down the left side of this form, so let’s return to Design view and turn it off.

  25. Switch to Design view, click the form selector (the box in the upper-left corner at the junction of the horizontal and vertical rulers), and then display the Property Sheet for the form.

  26. On the Format page of the Property Sheet, change the Record Selectors property to No. Then close the Property Sheet.

  27. Switch to Form view to verify that the form no longer has a record selector.

Clean Up

Close the Categories form, saving your changes. Retain the GardenCompany07 database for use in later exercises.

 
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