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Microsoft Outlook 2010 : Using Outlook with Exchange Server (part 1) - Sending Messages

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1/15/2013 10:36:04 AM

1. Sending Messages

When you send messages in Outlook 2010 while connected to Exchange Server, you have more options than you do when you use a regular Internet mail account—for example, you have the ability to recall messages, and you have access to a Global Address List (GAL).

To send a new message, you have a couple of choices:

  • In the Inbox or another message folder, click the New button on the ribbon.

  • In any folder, click New Items on the ribbon and choose E-Mail Message.

Whichever method that you use, a new message form opens, as shown in Figure 1.

Write a message and choose the options for this message using the standard message form.

Figure 1. Write a message and choose the options for this message using the standard message form.

Addressing Messages

You can designate the recipients of your message in two ways. The first method is to click To or Cc (or Bcc) to open the Select Names dialog adding recipients tobox, shown in Figure 2. By default, the GAL is displayed.

The Select Names dialog box displays addresses from the available address books.

Figure 2. The Select Names dialog box displays addresses from the available address books.

The GAL contains all users in the entire organization, except those who are explicitly hidden. An Exchange Server administrator can define other address lists on the computer running Exchange Server to filter addresses by any criteria, such as location, name, or department.

To add a message recipient, select the recipient in the list, and then click To, Cc, or Bcc. Double-click a recipient in the To, Cc, or Bcc field to view the recipient's properties so that you can verify his or her contact information.

One of the most useful features of the Select Names dialog box is the Find feature. Click Advanced Find to open the Find dialog box, shown in Figure 3. You can search the address book by any of the criteria shown, such as Title, Company, or Department. The ability to search the address book is most useful when you have a large organization and no additional address lists are defined.

You can search the address list for recipients matching specific criteria.

Figure 3. You can search the address list for recipients matching specific criteria.

The second way to add recipients to a message is the simplest: Type the recipient's name or alias in the To, Cc, or Bcc field on the message form. An Exchange Server alias is another way of referring to an account. The alias might be the user's Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) account, or it could be the first part of the email address (which could also be the same as the AD DS account).

Tip

INSIDE OUT Cut your typing time

You don't have to type the complete name or alias in an address field, so long as the part of the name that you type is unique. For example, if only one name in the address book matches Bob, you can type Bob as the recipient, even if the recipient's name is Bob Smith and the alias is bob.smith. If the recipient's name is Robert Smith and the alias is bob.smith, you can type either Rob or bob—both will resolve to Robert Smith.

Checking Names

As soon as you finish typing a recipient's name and move the insertion point out of the text box, Outlook 2010 checks the name. If the name is not unique or can't be found, it is underlined in red. When this occurs, you'll need to check the name manually.

You can also check a recipient's name by clicking Check Names in the Names group on the Message tab on the ribbon or by pressing Ctrl+K. When a problem arises, the Check Names dialog box appears, indicating whether the name is not unique or not found. When the name is not unique, all matches are displayed so that you can make a selection.

Note

If the name you typed is causing a problem, check the spelling of the name. This sounds simple enough, but a small mistake can prevent the name from being resolved. You might need to use the GAL or another address list to find the correct name.

Controlling When Messages Are Delivered

When a message is sent, it is delivered immediately by default. You can, however, delay message delivery until a specified time for an individual message. Delayed delivery is not specific to Exchange Server accounts, but the feature goes hand-in-hand with message expiration (covered next), so it bears discussing here.

To place a message in the Outbox but have it delivered after a certain point, click the More Options button in the More Options group on the Options tab to open the Properties dialog box. Select the Do Not Deliver Before check box, and then set the date and time using the drop-down lists. Click Close, then complete the message and click Send. It will not be sent until after the specified time.

Tip

If there is enough room on the ribbon, Outlook displays a Delay Delivery button that, when clicked, opens the Properties dialog box, where you can enter the delivery date and time.

Setting Messages to Expire

Just as you can delay the delivery of a message, you can also set a message to expire. The message expires and is removed from the recipient's mailbox after a specified period of time whether or not it has been read. You might want to have a message expire if its contents become outdated after a certain amount of time, or if you want to ensure that the message is deleted. To set this option, open the Properties dialog box by clicking Message Options on the Options tab, select the Expires After check box, and then set a date and time. The message will no longer be available to the recipient after that time.

Note

The capability to set a message to expire is not a security feature; it simply causes the message to be deleted after the specified period. 

 
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