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CorelDraw 10 : Complex Shapes - Polygons and Stars

5/18/2013 7:48:57 PM
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A polygon is a multisided closed figure. The simplest form of polygon is a triangle: a three-sided object. CorelDraw 10 enables you to create polygons with as many as 500 sides. A star is just a special instance of a polygon. Once you've a drawn polygon, you can easily change it into a star and vice versa.

To create a polygon:

1.
Select the Polygon Tool from the Object flyout in the toolbox or press.

The pointer changes to a cross-hair with a tiny polygon attached to it.

2.
On the property bar, click the Polygon icon and specify the desired number of sides in the Number of Points On Polygon text box (Figure 1).

Figure 1. Before or after drawing a polygon or star, you can set or change its options on the property bar.


3.
To create the polygon, click and drag diagonally.

When you release the mouse button, nodes appear around the object's perimeter and the object is selected (Figure 2).

Figure 2. This is a selected polygon with seven sides.


To create a star:

1.
Select the Polygon Tool from the Object flyout in the toolbox or press.

The pointer changes to a cross-hair with a tiny polygon attached to it.

2.
On the property bar, click the Star icon and specify the number of sides in the Number of Points On Polygon text box (Figure 1).

3.
To create the star, click and drag diagonally.

When you release the mouse button, nodes appear around the object's perimeter and the object is selected (Figure 3).

Figure 3. This is a selected star with seven points.


Polygon as Star

Using the Polygon Tool, you can create another type of star called polygon as star. Unlike the star you just created, a polygon as star is an outline that is easily filled with a color, texture, or pattern.

To create a polygon as star:
1.
Double-click the Polygon Tool.

The Options dialog box appears open to the Polygon Tool section (Figure 4).

Figure 4. Click the Polygon as Star radio button, set options, and then click OK to dismiss the dialog box.


2.
Click the Polygon as Star radio button.

3.
Specify the number of points for the star and adjust the Sharpness slider bar.

As you change settings, the prospective star is shown in the preview window.

4.
Click OK.

The drawing window reappears.

5.
Click and drag to create a polygon as star (Figure 5).

Figure 5. Drag a handle to resize a polygon as star or a node to change its angularity.


Release the mouse button and the object is selected.

Modifying a polygon or star

After drawing a polygon or star, you can alter it in any of the following ways:

  • Change a selected polygon into a star or a star into a polygon by clicking the Star or Polygon icon on the property bar.

  • Change the number of sides by choosing or entering a different number in the text box on the property bar.

  • Rotate the object by typing a number in the Angle of Rotation text box on the property bar. You can also rotate an object by clicking its center and then dragging one of the rotation arrows (Figure 6).

    Figure 6. Click and drag any rotation arrow to rotate the object.

  • Alter the sharpness (Figure 7) of any star with seven or more points by moving the Sharpness slider on the property bar.

    Figure 7. From left to right, these three images show the sharpness settings (1–3) for a 10-sided star. The more sides a star has, the more sharpness settings there are.

  • Change the a polygon or star's line thickness, outline color, or fill.

  • Change the object's size by clicking and dragging a handle.

Tips

  • The default settings for the Polygon Tool—not the settings on the property bar— determine whether you'll draw a polygon or a star, its number of sides, and its sharpness. To set new defaults (Figure 8), double-click the Polygon Tool icon or set polygon options on the property bar when no object is selected.

    Figure 8. In the Polygon Tool section of the Options dialog box, you can specify the default object that will be drawn when you use the Polygon Tool.

  • When you change the setting in the Number of Points On Polygon text box (see Figure 1), it only affects new polygons or any polygon that is currently selected. Other polygons are unchanged.

  • You can draw a polygon or star with equal-length sides by pressing as you draw. If you press as you draw, the object will be drawn from its center.

 
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