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Microsoft Project 2010 : Entering Tracking Information at the Task Level (part 3)
This field enables you to display and enter the amount of task duration that has been used so far in the project. If you enter a value less than the total scheduled duration,
Microsoft Project 2010 : Entering Tracking Information at the Task Level (part 2) - Editing the Task Actual Start Date
The Task Type conditions you select from the Task Information settings can affect all the tracking fields. Fixed Work, Fixed Duration, and Fixed Units tasks behave differently to data edit changes, so make sure you consider the task type settings as you update tracking data.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Entering Tracking Information at the Task Level (part 1)
Covers of this section how to employ to detect fields on the level of task to update the statute of task. It is how you would write progress manually, if you choose to employ this method.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Tracking Your Project’s Performance and Costs - Understanding the Fields Used in Updating the Project Schedule
The key with the progress of advance of your project is feedback which you obtain your resources about their progress and then to write this information in your project
Microsoft Project 2010 : Tracking Your Project Progress - Working with Project Baselines (part 2) - Using Usage Views to Show Time-Phased Details
The Task Usage view displays tasks with each resource assigned within individual rows below the task. The Resource Usage view simply inverts the data, showing resources with a list of task assignments for each resource.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Tracking Your Project Progress - Working with Project Baselines (part 1) - Viewing Baselines
The principal thing to remember when preparing to the base line your project is that neither the project nor the base line is crowned.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Performing a Schedule Reality Check - Baselining the Schedule
One of the last steps in preparing your project for execution is baselining it. A baseline represents a snapshot of all the planned data as it was outlined within the contract and approved by project stakeholders.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Strategies for Analyzing Costs
In addition to schedule and resources, cost plays a significant role in each project. Often when reviewing your final project schedule, it is important to review the project costs and attempt to reduce them as much as possible.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Reviewing the Project-Level Statistics
As an element of your confrontation with the reality of program, it is important to thus examine the statistics of level of the project you can see the metric high level one about the program. To make thus, follow these stages:
Microsoft Project 2010 : Reviewing the Big Picture (Critical Path Analysis)
The critical path can be defined like more long way through your project and as a whole determines the date of completion for the project.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Performing a Schedule Reality Check (part 2) - Looking for Technique Errors
Remember, the more detailed the schedule is, the more work it will be to maintain as the project progresses. Many project managers make the mistake of building overly elaborate, highly detailed schedules only to find that the maintaining them takes far more time than what it’s worth.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Performing a Schedule Reality Check (part 1) - Looking for Logic Errors, Schedule Estimation Methods
Logic errors in a project occur when, for example, you forget a task or summary task while setting up your project, or schedule your tasks in the wrong order. It can be difficult to judge your own schedule as the errors might be harder to notice because of how familiar you are with it.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Capturing Project Progress (part 4) - Assessing the Impacts of Updates
Because your project is updated with real data, the dates of other, the tasks dependant in your project will be affected. For example, if the task B cannot start until the completions of task
Microsoft Project 2010 : Capturing Project Progress (part 3) - Gathering Status Updates from Resources - Actual Work Per Day, Remaining Work, Expected Finish Date
Because the resources are providing a day-by-day account of actual work, they do not need to provide the actual start date separately. The first day of actual work provided in the day-by-day account of work is the actual start date.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Capturing Project Progress (part 2) - Gathering Status Updates from Resources - Actual Start, Percent Work Complete, Remaining Work
The resources should periodically bring back their work and statute of task, or using the waiter of project or by other means, such as reports on the state of progress of the work or the weekly meetings.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Capturing Project Progress (part 1) - Baselining Your Project
After your project is at the beginning installed, it can be useful to place a base line of project.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Working with Resources - Editing an Existing Resource Assignment
By splitting a task, you create a gap between one part of the task and another. This keeps the actual work where it was recorded but enables you to move the remaining work to a later time within the project schedule. When you split a task, all resource assignments for the task are split.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Working with Resources - Adjusting Resource Calendars, Assigning Resources to Tasks
You have a few different ways to assign work, material, and cost resources to tasks in your project. The Task Information dialog box provides a convenient location to identify details about the resource assignment, including the assignment owner and what percentage of the resource will be used for the task.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Working with Resources - Understanding Resource Types and Other Factors, Adding Resources to Your Project
The process for adding a resource to your project is different, depending on whether you’re adding a resource used only in your project (a local resource) or an enterprise resource available for assignment throughout your organization (Project Professional only).
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 10) - Playing What-If Games
Inactive tasks also work well if you want to document nice-to-have work. Create tasks, assign resources, and fill in other fields; then make the tasks inactive. Their values are visible (and editable) but don’t affect your project schedule. If you find that the project has the time and budget for the work, you can make them active.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 9) - Paying More for Faster Delivery
Spending more money to deliver in less time can make financial sense. A high-tech doodad that will be obsolete in 2 years can’t afford a delay getting to market. The sales you make could add up to more than the premium you have to pay to finish the project earlier.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 8) - Overlapping Tasks - Finding Tasks to Fast-Track
Some tasks are more conducive to overlapping than others. For example, tasks earlier in the project are riskier to overlap.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 7) - Adjusting Resource Assignments - Assigning a Different Resource , Using Slack Time to Shorten the Schedule
Suppose a resource works on two simultaneous tasks on the critical path. You can’t delay either one without affecting the project finish date.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 6) - Adjusting Resource Assignments - Increasing Units to Decrease Duration
Selecting a task in the table area shows the first resource assigned to that task in the Resource Graph in the bottom pane. To see other resources assigned to the task, click the horizontal scroll bar under the resource legend (on the left).
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 5) - Project Tools for Change - Undoing Changes
Some adverse results are obvious, like a delay in a project finish date after you change the standard work time. Most of the time, though, as in a game of chess, you can’t tell whether a strategy will pay off until you’re a few moves in.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 4) - Project Tools for Change - Seeing What Changes Do
Suppose you assign an additional resource to shorten a task’s duration. When the task finishes earlier, its successor tasks start and finish sooner. Change highlighting lights up the task Start and Finish cells with background color, as Figure 7 demonstrates.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 3) - Evaluating the Project Schedule - Reviewing Project Costs
By assigning work, material, and cost resources to tasks, Project can calculate the price tag for your project. You can show costs in many of the standard views by applying a table with cost fields.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 2) - Evaluating the Project Schedule - Finding the Best Tasks to Shorten
When a project schedule is too long, you want to rein it in with the least amount of disruption to the work you’ve done so far. The critical path controls a project’s finish date, because it’s the longest sequence of tasks in a project.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Refining a Project Schedule (part 1) - Evaluating the Project Schedule - Comparing Finish Dates to Deadlines
Finish dates are conspicuous in the Gantt Chart timescale, because that’s where task bars end. The Finish field also appears in the Entry, Schedule, Summary, Usage, and Variance tables, to name a few. But what you really want is to see whether the finish dates come on or before the project’s deadlines.
Microsoft Project 2010 : Setting Up Project for Your Use - Defining Environment Options (part 6)
The Customize Ribbon tab is used to add or subtract controls from the Ribbon (see Figure 11). Options available in the left pane are filtered by the Choose commands from the drop-down above the left pane. The right pane enables you to specify the location of added controls.
 
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