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: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 5) - Policies vs. Preferences
Policies are registry-based settings that can be fully managed by administrators and Group Policy. These are also referred to as true policies. In contrast, registry-based settings that are configured by users or are set as a default state by the operating system at installation are referred to as preferences.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 4) - Managing .adm Templates
Over time, you will make changes to the custom .adm templates that you have implemented within your GPOs. Built-in controls are available that help update new versions of the .adm templates. To make this process easier, it is best to have a dedicated workstation for creating and modifying GPOs.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 3) - Adding .adm Templates
Let’s look at an example in which you need to add the Visio11.adm template to a GPO named OFFICE11. The Visio11.adm template is currently located on the desktop of the computer from which you are editing the GPO.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 2) - Default Installed .adm Templates
Every new GPO has default Administrative Template sections. These sections are created by three or more .adm templates, depending on the operating system you are working with.
: Windows Server 2008 and Windows Vista : Administrative (.adm) Templates (part 1) - Default .adm Templates
Every computer running Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows Server 2003 comes with some default .adm templates. These files are used to create the default interface under the Administrative Templates portions of a GPO.
Windows Server 2008 : Using netdom (part 3) - Querying and Resetting Secure Channels with netdom
You can use the netdom command to query and verify secure channels between computers in the domain. When needed, you can use the netdom command to reset these channels.
Windows Server 2008 : Using netdom (part 2) - Verifying Trust Relationships
Figure 1 shows the Active Directory Domains and Trusts console with a parent domain (pearson.pub) and a child domain (training.pearson.pub). There is a parent/child trust relationship between the two domains. Furthermore, the outgoing trust has been validated.
Windows Server 2008 : Using netdom (part 1) - Identifying Operations Master Roles, Joining a Computer to a Domain
You can join a computer to a domain from the command prompt using the netdom join command. The following table shows the different switches available with the netdom join command.
Windows Server 2008 R2 high-availability and recovery features : Planning for High Availability
Deploying HA features on your network requires adequate planning and testing prior to production use of the solution. One of the first planning steps you should perform is to determine what the expected uptime requirements are for the system.
Windows Server 2008 R2 high-availability and recovery features : Introduction to High Availability
Windows Server 2008 R2 offers several features to ensure that applications and network services can sustain a failure of a primary server without the application or service experiencing significant downtime.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 11)
Remember that the label name within Hyper-V needs to be a fully qualified domain name (see Figure 34). Additionally, the VM must have Remote Desktop turned on.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 10)
Now that the Virtualization Host is set up, we need to install and configure the Remote Desktop Connection Broker. The Connection Broker manages the process of connecting the client workstation to the virtual machine running on Hyper-V.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 9)
By installing this role service, Hyper-V will be installed as a required component. Prior to installing Remote Desktop Virtualization Host, you will need to ensure that your server hardware supports Hyper-V.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 8)
Using Remote Desktop Virtualization Host role services, you can deploy a fully featured VDI within your organization. A VDI allows you to provide computer workstation capabilities to your users, while maintaining the workstation, a virtual computer, inside the datacenter.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 7)
The Remote Desktop Gateway provides the ability to securely connect to Remote Desktop applications from outside your corporate firewall without the need for a VPN connection.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 6)
Remote Desktop Web Access creates a Web-based portal with links to RemoteApps. Deploying Remote Desktop Web Access, in most cases, can remove the administrative burden of having to create and manage custom RDP connection files.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 5)
The Remote Desktop Licensing services role is used to manage and renew Remote Desktop Services CALs. A server with the Remote Desktop Licensing services role is required so that Remote Desktop Session Host servers can properly license themselves and manage how many people are connected.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 4)
The Remote Desktop Session Host Configuration console is used to set up and configure connections to the Remote Desktop Server. A default connection is already set up during the installation of the role service.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 3)
You can now connect to the RemoteApp from another computer. To do so, you will need to connect to the RemoteApp via the Web interface (discussed later in this section) or a custom remote desktop file. In this exercise, we will create a custom remote desktop file to use.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 2)
RemoteApp Manager is used to create and manage applications installed on the server that will serve as a RemoteApp. To set up a RemoteApp perform the following
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : Installing and Configuring Remote Desktop Services (part 1)
The Remote Desktop Session Host is what you might consider the traditional Remote Desktop Services (or Terminal Services) role. The Remote Desktop Session Host provides presentation virtualization by remotely displaying server-hosted applications or desktops to PCs and thin clients.
Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Services : What is New in Remote Desktop Services
With the release of Windows Server 2008 R2, Terminal Services has been renamed Remote Desktop Services. If you have experience administering Terminal Server in previous operating systems, you should be aware of the new Windows Server 2008 R2 names of various Terminal Server technologies.
Windows Server 2008 : Group Policy Command-Line Tools - Refreshing Group Policy Settings with gpupdate
Group Policy settings for computers are applied when the computer starts. The logon screen appears after the settings are applied.
Windows Server 2008 : Group Policy Command-Line Tools - Viewing Group Policy Settings with gpresult
Saves the report in HTML format. You can then open the file in Internet Explorer by just entering the filename at the command prompt or double-clicking it in Windows Explorer.
Windows Server 2008 : Group Policy Overview - Using Loopback Processing, Running Scripts with Group Policy
Group Policy settings applied to users normally take precedence over Group Policy settings that apply to computers. As a reminder, the last Group Policy that is applied is the one that takes precedence.
Windows Server 2008 : Group Policy Overview - Blocking Inheritance, Enforcing GPOs
By default, GPO settings from GPOs at higher levels are automatically inherited at lower levels. For example, each OU automatically inherits all GPO settings set at the domain level. In this context, each OU is a child of the domain. Similarly, children OUs automatically inherit GPO settings from parent OUs; however, you can block this behavior.
Windows Server 2008 : Understanding Group Policy Settings (part 2) - Deploying Applications
You can also deploy applications with Group Policy. Advanced tools, such as Microsoft’s System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM), give you additional capabilities such as scheduling the deployments. However, you can use Group Policy to deploy applications without buying SCCM.
Windows Server 2008 : Understanding Group Policy Settings (part 1) - Enabling Auditing Through Group Policy
Administrators use Group Policy to administer and manage users and computers within a domain. There are literally thousands of Group Policy settings. The goal isn’t to know them all but instead to understand a few key Group Policy settings, how they’re created, and how they apply. The following sections cover a few Group Policy settings.
Windows Server 2008 : Filtering GPOs by Modifying Permissions
As soon as a user logs in to the domain, the user account is automatically added to the Authenticated Users group. In other words, all GPOs automatically apply to any user that logs in because the GPOs apply to the Authenticated Users group by default.
Windows Server 2008 : Launching the Group Policy Management Console, Understanding Group Policy Order of Precedence
The majority of the work with Group Policy starts with the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC). Figure 1 shows the GPMC with the Default Domain Policy selected and the Default Domain Controllers Policy showing.
 
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